Author Topic: Recumbent advice?  (Read 27749 times)

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Offline TheDaltonBoys

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #15 on: October 19, 2005, 10:32:37 am »
OmahaNeb - Comparison by virtue of literature only. I've ridden a long wheel base recumbent w/under seat steering, and a have been a long time admirer of the Bachetta for its utter simplicity and effectiveness of design. With a tadpole, (near as I can figure) the resistance is less of a factor than a DF bicycle (same lack of resistance as a regular recumbent). Now the footprint of a tadpole trike is wider and I'm uncomfortable with that having been car-less for 6 years now so the "dicey" nature of cycling with vehicles becomes exacerbated given the footprint. Well, in my mind its a factor that I'll have to accept. I don't think I have more or less of a gear inches advantage between a trike and a "regular" recumbent so all of these considerations were what led me to my decision to go with a tadpole trike. I am a "late-comer" to bent riding/technology, but I believe the benefits are incredibly obvious with the seat and its location as well as other virtues. Thanks for asking, and please offer any advice you may feel appropriate for me....hey I've done some homework, but I'm not a resident expert. Enjoy the Voyage.......Marki of the Dalton Boys


Offline OmahaNeb

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #16 on: October 19, 2005, 12:25:38 pm »
Thanks for the response.  My next bike I want to be a recumbent or trike.  My 2 boys work at a bike shop and have test ridden a trike after they have built one.  They say they are a blast to ride.  It reminds them of hot wheels they had when they were younger.  With your research, in general is a trike slower than a recumbent?  Other than the extra wheel, I can't see any inherent issues.  With your current under seat steering recumbent, are there stability issues on uphills and down hills?  If you need to push the recumbent with under seat steering, how do you keep it moving straight?

Thanks

Offline TheDaltonBoys

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2005, 06:19:53 pm »
OmahaNeb - I freely admit here that going downhill on a 2 wheel bent bike is probably more efficient as the balance factors more closely resemble a DF two wheeler. I have read (I haven't taken delivery of my trike yet), that trikes do not lend themselves to a hell-for-leather descent and that I seem to hear that 18 mph is a rather distinguished average speed on the flats....again I have only what I've read to base an opinion on. The steering requires a little getting used to but that once mastered is as natural as when we first learned to ride a bicycle (remember the thrill?). I'm getting a WizWheelz 3.6 CroMoly frame that weighs in at just over 36 lbs. but I need nearly bulletproof if I'm gonna be hangin' out there like Johnny Appleseed without the apple seeds plus I've got this Aussie Cattle Dog that strangely is happy to see me everytime I get home....loyalty like that deserves a "tour" so there's a trailer there, and then I plan on hooking on a BoB trailer and by golly although I won't be fast, I'll see a lot and hopefully won't hurt so much at the end of the day. I'm so looking forward to re-inventing myself after retirement!!! There are a couple of trike riders at the Veloway here in Austin TX. one on a Scarab and the other on a CaTrike and they've been most helpful in answering questions....the CaTrike guy kept up with me on my Lightspeed road bike....he looked so much more comfortable. Enjoy the Voyage and I'll keep you posted on the discovery process.....Mark of the Dalton Boys


Offline TheDaltonBoys

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #18 on: December 21, 2005, 09:09:18 am »
OmahaNeb - Well after a bit of a delay, I took delivery of my tadpole Trike Recumbent yesterday (WizWheelz 3.6) and thus far this is what I've found: as advertised, when I get into a campground there will be no need to pull out a seat, (already "on" one), although I've yet to go up a steep hill my trike came with a strap for the brakes so if I stop on an ascent I can put on the brakes and take a break, and finally...that much fun (as you reported in an earlier missive) is, I believe illegal in at least 37 of the Lower 48 States!!! Won't be able to commute with it as the wheelbase just makes it impractical, but do live near a heavily used by cyclists road. Enjoy the Voyage...Mark of The Dalton Boys


Offline OmahaNeb

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #19 on: December 21, 2005, 01:32:22 pm »
"Mark of The Dalton Boys"....What a great Christmas gift.  Another plus to having a trike......  If you put it on your indoor trainer, you have a lounge chair to watch TV.  Keep us informed on your impressions of the trike.  Merry Christmas.


Offline TheDaltonBoys

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #20 on: December 21, 2005, 06:47:04 pm »
....after I get this HUGE grin off of my face, I will be only too happy to send my first impressions....why does my face hurt? Enjoy the voyage.....Mark of the Dalton Boys  PS - No worries on the indoor trainer, I live in Austin, TX. Woo Hoo!!!!


Offline dknapp

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2006, 01:50:46 pm »
It might be harder to miss potholes and bumps because you always have to make a more complex calcualtion on where to steer.  See if you can rent one to try out first.


Offline bentrider1a

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #22 on: February 09, 2006, 02:25:53 am »
I HAVE BEEN BENT FOR THREE YEARS NOW AND WOULD NEVER GO BACK TO DF.  I DID THE CYCLE UTAH PARKS WHERE WE WENT UP 14-18% GRADE HILLS SPINING ALL THE WAY.  I HAD A BALL, PASSED A LOT OF DF RIDERS UP THE HILLS WHO WERE WALKING.  LWB'S ARE GREAT FOR TOURING, SOME OF THE SWB'S WITH THE 406/451 FRONT ARE VERY GOOD ALSO.  TRY THEM ALL BEFORE YOU BUY.

Steve
2002 GOLDRUSH
Steve
2002 GOLDRUSH

Offline ron654

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #23 on: February 09, 2006, 11:12:10 pm »
For those who may be interested in my progress since my original post, I am now the owner of a Rans Stratus XP.  I bought it at Richard's Bicyles in Garden Grove (an Orange County suburb of LA) because of their excellent treatment of me as a customer as well as their wide selection of recumbents.  There may be another shop or two in So. Cal. as good as theirs but I couldn't find one in the limited time I had for shopping.  

I picked the Rans primarily because its steering was the closest to neutral I could find and I live on a rural road where I can't afford much of a learning/ unlearning curve.  The Tour Easy was in the same class for ease of steering but cost over $300 more. (I decided that the fairing was not something I need to pay for at this time.)  The Burley Canto (in LWB configuration) was next -- significantly less expensive  but noticeably more touchy in steering.  All the SWB 'bents were much more twitchy although I thought I could adapt to a Bruchetta the fastest.

More on the learning experience later . . . .

ron654


Offline bent4me

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #24 on: February 15, 2006, 10:24:06 am »
Great 1st choice.  I have a 00 Stratus with over 18k miles.  I have tried the XP and believe it is the best do all recumbent on the market. Fast, good climber and with it's passive suspension one of the most comfortable rides.  Remember it will take a few months to develop those bent legs.  Good Luck and Keep Riding.
Marty

This message was edited by bent4me on 2-15-06 @ 6:34 AM

Offline ron654

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #25 on: March 03, 2006, 01:11:34 pm »
For prospective converts to recumbency, here are a few of my observations about the learning process (while they are still fresh in my head).  

Use of the upper body /arms to aid in propulsion is counter-productive on a recumbent -- the only thing it does is send you all over the road.  To those who (like me) have an long-ingrained habit of using DF handlebars to aid in aggressive acceleration (especially up hills or from a start), you will have to work at it a while to break the old habits.  I recommend restricting yourself to wide-shouldered roads with minimal traffic  initially.

You will also have to learn to use low gears and spin at higher RPMs if you are not in the habit of doing so already.  I'm using a Blackburn trainer while watching the evening news for just that purpose and it is helping.  But I am finding that the greatly increased leg speed on a trainer doesn't fully translate to the road so I am having to concentrate on it there too.

The other big change is in the effects of the recumbent position on vision.  I knew that being lower would affect my ability to see somewhat but the degree to which vehicles block my line of sight still surprised me.  Much more attention is required to "hidden" hazards and I was fairly attentive to start.  

A second  visibility problem is that the 'bent position increases  the incidence of "sun-blindness".  I purchased a Bell mtn. bike helmet with the largest visor I could find (locally) and always wear sunglasses but still find myself squinting and looking away from the sun a lot in the 2 hours after sunrise or before sunset.   If anyone has a source for a better visor (or other solution), I'd love to hear it.

Smooth roads to all!




Offline TheDaltonBoys

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #26 on: March 03, 2006, 05:59:32 pm »
My fellow "bentists", have thoroughly enjoyed reading these missives on recumbency. Being a "Trikist" most of these priciples apply where learning of or converting to recumbent cycles is concerned. I can only add that where Tadpole Trikes are concerned that when one turns, one has to lean as well else you will "roll". That said I have to admit that I fondly remember that with 2 wheels it pretty much involved balance on a vertical axis starting with the tires and stopping at the top of the helmet...I do miss that. Other than this I tell people that recumbent riding is like pedalling around on a lawn chair, and with a trike if I need to stop on an incline I just pull on the brakes and keep my seat, when I start to slow way down I don't have to balance myself, and my personal favorite, when I pull into my campsite I already have a good seat. enjoy the voyage fellow benters.......Mark of the Dalton Boys


Offline BikingViking

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #27 on: March 04, 2006, 09:51:52 pm »
No doubt, go bent. I switched 4 years ago and will never go back. I ride an Easy Racer Tour Easy, but I suggest to you to find a dealer that has many different models to choose from and ride them all. I chose the Tour Easy because of it's comfort. You wont' speed up the hills as quickly right away, but in time you will learn to use different muscle groups and hills will become less daunting. Before going to a recumbent I had knee problems due to the downward pressure on them. Riding the bent has eliminated all of that by strengthening the muscles around the knee. Besides, it is nice to see where you are going.


Offline ptaylor

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #28 on: March 05, 2006, 05:14:45 pm »
This topic has certainly gotten a lot of interest. Let me tell you my experience, as it may be helpful to others thinking of switching to a 'bent.

About 10 years ago, I started having neck problems (herniated disk). I bought a  under-seat-steering 'bent with a Bob trailer which I used for commuting and a 400 mile self contained tour.

I was very pleased because it kept me on a bike. I could ride all day long and nothing would be sore. After about 3 years my neck disk healed (my doctor said herniated disks usually do this) and I went back to the upright bike.

From what I gather, few riders go back. Why did I go back to the upright?
1. Better visibility - I can see over cars.
2. I don't have to remember to downshift before coming to a stop (or suffering the consequences of a painful-knee too-high-a-gear start). That is to say, I can stand up and pedal if I'm in too high a gear.
3. I can turn my head and look behind me - not relying solely on my helmet mirror.

I still have my 'bent, in case my neck acts up again.

Gramps
Paul

Offline TheDaltonBoys

Recumbent advice?
« Reply #29 on: March 07, 2006, 09:14:00 am »
....I have to admit that given my car-free existence and its attendant bicycle commuting, I ride an "upright" for obvious resons (lots of cars, trike too wide etc.) but the rest of the time its trike time.....also as its said in our human powered lives....you can not own too many bikes.  Enjoying the voyage....Mark of the Dalton Boys