Author Topic: Chains  (Read 5131 times)

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Offline HWT

Chains
« on: June 26, 2006, 04:44:10 pm »
I could use a little advice.
I seem to be going through chains like tires.
I usually have my mechanic adjust my drive package two or three times a year. Almost everytime he says "your chain is shot,how old is it?" Should I be going through chains every 1000 miles or so?
I am not light. I am 6'-0 and weigh 215 and ride my road bike fareley hard three or four thimes a week.



Offline gponce101

Chains
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2006, 07:37:28 pm »
Is the shop replacing it with a quality chain? I would recommend buying a chain wear tool from like Park Tools and you can check the chain yourself.

It's possible to be wearing out a chain in 1000 miles I suppose. Lots of factors like how much maintenaqnce do you do on the chain between replacement, riding on flats or lots of climbing etc. I had 1700 miles on a Shimano Ultegra chain and the LBS mech said they are only good for like 700 miles. That cost a chain and cassette. I've been using Wipperman chains for a couple years now and have good results.


Offline DaveB

Chains
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2006, 08:09:02 am »
Quote
I had 1700 miles on a Shimano Ultegra chain and the LBS mech said they are only good for like 700 miles.

Find a different mechanic, yours is ripping you off.  Either that or you ride in horribly abrasive conditions.

I've used many Ultegra level (and below) chains, in both 8 and 9-speed form, for over 7000 miles each with only 1/16" "stretch" and never any failures and I ride in very hilly conditions so the chains aren't treated kindly.  Something is wrong here.


Offline biker_james

Chains
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2006, 08:19:18 am »
I'd agree that the mechanic is probably taking advantage of you. Pick up a chain checker and find out for yourself. They may be worn out ( I guess) if you never clean and lube them, but with reasonable maintenance they should last a lot longer than a few months.


FredHiltz

  • Guest
Chains
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2006, 09:10:36 am »
I agree as well. Something is wrong, probably chain hygiene. You can get a good--and old--argument going on any forum about the best lube, but any of them will do well if cleaned and replaced regularly.

My own choice is paraffin, redone after 400 miles or the first rainy day. I alternate two plain vanilla chains so I can can cook both at once. Away from home I use White Lightning, a wax + solvent lube, on the same schedule. This combo gives me 15,000 - 18,000 miles on two chains. Best of all, I can handle the chain without getting filthy.

Fred


FredHiltz

  • Guest
Chains
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2006, 09:14:31 am »
I forgot to add that you can get a good idea of chain stretch with just a foot ruler. Pull the chain taut and see how far past the 12-inch mark a pin lies. 1/16" is OK. 1/8" is getting close to where the chain will skip and certainly is wearing the cogs more than necessary.

Fred


Offline RussellSeaton

Chains
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2006, 06:17:06 pm »
Chains are cheap.  Nashbar has their KMC made chains in recumbent length on sale frequently for $15.  Less 10% on top of that.  The recumbent chains are 232 links.  So they are really 2 chains.  $7 a chain is not too bad.  Just replace it every 1,000-1,500 miles.

Best way to check for chain stretch is to cut a new chain to the length you need.  Put your old one and the new one on a nail and see if they are the same length or if the old one is much longer.  A new chain is about 4.5 feet long.  Roughly 108 links.  If the old one is 1/4" longer than the new one, replace it with the new one.