Author Topic: A recumbant for centuries and possible touring  (Read 14579 times)

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Offline Sailariel

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« on: September 20, 2006, 10:44:03 pm »
Am a newbie (2 years) and ride a Fuji road racer, and a somewhat large Miyata Cross converted for touring. The M is also my commuter. I know ZERO about recumbents but have seen some really positive stuff in this forum. Can someone steer me to some literature, web sites, or some simple down home info. It would be greatly appreciated.


Offline pmspirito

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2006, 11:08:43 pm »
We  have 2 bents. A Catrike Speed, www.catrike.com and an Easy Racer EZ-1 SC-Lite. www.EZracer.com (i think) also go to www.bentrideronline.com for the best recumbent forum.  All "regular" bicycles basically look alike. You pick your price, and pick your color.  Recumbents all look different.  And the price points are all over the place. Our EZ racer is a $500 "compact-long-wheel-base" available on e-bay and has served me very well.  The Catrike is a tadpole trike (2 wheels in front and 1 in back) it has disc brakes, is very fast, and costs like $1400.00.  Any time you see someone on a bent, flag them down, they will be thrilled to share their experiences with you.  Just imagine riding down the road sitting in a lazy-boy recliner all day.  Its really that good.

best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito
best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito

Offline Sailariel

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2006, 11:29:06 pm »
Peter and Judy, Thanks a million. Willcheck out the web sites and try to find a dealer for a tryout. I have been training hard and am in pretty good shape for a 65year old with a plastic hip. I do get a bit achy, especially after a fairly brisk 30 miler. It is really hilly in midcoast Maine. We also have a fairly short season. Been living ashore for the past two years--quite an adjustment after 14 years of cruising on our sailboat. A 27speed Fuji with a 105 grouppo weighing less than 20 pounds is a far cry from the 16 inch wheel folding Dahons with 3 speed SA we have ridden for all those years. I will take your advice and keep you posted. Ariel310@verizon.net Take care and thank you.         Regards, Alex


Offline TheDaltonBoys

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2006, 02:19:15 pm »
I have a WizWheel 3.6 (Tour) trike and haven't had it but ten months and this much I think I know: whether 2 or 3 wheeled, recumbents are incredibly comfortable, way too much fun, at least MY trike is a pig going up hill but I can always stop on the hill and take a break and not worry about balance, already have a great camping seat, I do OK on flats, downhills can be "twitchy" unless terribly familiar with a trike (2-wheelers are VERY good down hill). Some 2 wheelers actually climb like homesick angels. Now my other bike is a Novara Randonee which is my commuter/touring bike because at the end of the day my hugely fun recumbent is a bit "beamy" to take most places (apologies to Heidi). Doesn't mean I won't tour with the trike....just haven't yet. Try to at least take a test ride on a recumbent before buying one though even if it means traveling some distance to do so. Bottom line....its all human powered....enjoy the Voyage....Mark of the Dalton Boys


Offline Sailariel

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2006, 06:24:22 pm »
Thanks for the comeback. I have an appointment to try out a Sun Bicycles EZ-Sport CX to see what it feels like. I have this fantasy that it will handle like the chopped Harley I had in the early 70`s with the small skinny wheel way out there and the big fat tire in the rear, not to mention the high handlebar. It should be fun. Now I need to find a trike to check out. I`ll keep you posted.       Alex


Offline pmspirito

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2006, 07:37:28 pm »
Ah, the chopper, don't I know it.  It does take some practice to get the rump rump rump varoom sound just right. In regards to Mark's reference to Heidi you need to check out www.crazyguyonabike.com for some awesome touring journals, Search for Heidi Domesion, I know I spelled her last name wrong. She has done a couple of epic trike tours. One from NC to Alaska and back to NC, and another from Canada to Mexico along the Continental Divide. Excellent reading. :)

best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito
best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito

Offline TheDaltonBoys

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2006, 11:39:40 am »
...AND Heidi did it all on a Tadpole Recumbent Trike to include the Great Divide which is not exactly "trike territory". Trikes generally are: Greenspeed's (Australian, very well made, and pricey), Tri-muters (California, well made and less pricey), CaTrike's (which the famous couple in the back of the pack use, made in Florida, well made and about same cost as Trimuter's), WizWheelz (made in Michigan, reputedly a great entry level trike well built, and a little less pricey think "Ford" of Tadpole Trikes, and ICE (English made, well made and pricey). If touring is in your head on a Trike you will have to look at those "extras" that cost, well extra like fenders, racks, the same stuff our DF family members contend with to set up bikes for touring. Enjoy the Voyage and let us know what ya ended up getting!!  Mark of the Dalton Boys PS - Strongly encourage you to look at the website quoted by Judy...great source of education about ALL recumbents, or "bents".


Offline pmspirito

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2006, 08:53:46 pm »
Recumbents in general are the most comfortable way to ride.  The 2-wheel bent like I have and you are going to test ride is a good way to go. Its like riding in a Cadillac. The tadpole trike is a Ferrari. Have fun and keep us updated. :)and  ;)

best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito
best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito

Offline rootchopper

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2006, 05:08:18 pm »
I ride a Tour Easy recumbent (2 wheeler).  It costs about $2000. I bought it four years ago.  It has 20,000 miles on it.  Needless to say, I think it's working out for me.   I've done three tours on it and about 400 commutes.

I like it so much I am having a great deal of difficulty selecting my next bike which will almots certainly be a recumbent.

Another possibility for you is to look for a Burley recumbent. Burley just discontinued manufacturing recumbents so you may be able to get one at a substantially reduced price.


Offline Sailariel

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2006, 08:36:29 pm »
Peter and Judy,  Tried the EZ Rider CX and was quite wobbly at first. It goes well on the flats and is downright impressive downhill. The machine did not have a computer so I really did not know how fast I was going--felt like 50 on a 1 mile straight downhill I usually do at 40 on my Fuji. Of course you are so close to the ground so that gives you more of a sensation of speed. You are absolutely right---these bikes are COMFORTABLE. I did have to work hard on a long moderate hill--I noticed that it is difficult to muscle a larger ring, so one is left to spin like mad to make progress. My test ride was 30 miles. I think I`ll research recumbents this winter and try a bunch in the spring. They do feel a bit like my old Harley chopper I rode in 71. Take care. I`ll keep you posted                         Alex


Offline pmspirito

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2006, 08:55:14 pm »
Your are a HERO for a 30 mile first ride.  Keep in mind you need to develope a new set of leg muscles. Also slideing the seat front/back makes a big difference in the power you can apply. Sliding the seat forward allows you to press your back againest the seat.  And clippless pedals are very good too.  You waste no energy trying to keep you feet from slipping down off of the pedals.  Glad you had a great first ride.   :)and ;)

best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito
best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito

Offline Sailariel

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2006, 06:38:13 pm »
Peter and Judy, I adjusted the seat so that my knees were slightly bent at the bottomn of the stroke like on a regular bike. I brought my own pedals-combination platform and SPD. Used the platforms while I was wobbly and when I got the hang of it, I clipped in. Will try a Burley Spyder next. Saw a recumbent with a 700C rear wheel and what appeared to be a 24" wheel up front. It had a transpearant fairing and a high narrowish seat. He was going pretty fast. He went by our house. It did look expensive. You are right about the muscles. Thank God I do leg preddes and squats 3 times a week. Thanks for all the help.      Alex


Offline pmspirito

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2006, 10:30:27 pm »
I think you're hooked. So Cool.  :)and ;)

best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito
best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito

Offline TheDaltonBoys

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2006, 11:22:11 am »
SailAriel - after you've got your "bent" muscles built up, certain parts of your anatomy will be so hard you could use it as a cutting board. Glad your spending some time researching...I forgot another trike...HP Velotechnik who make a Tadpole Trike as well as two wheeled bents...German made and "spensive". As you now know riding a recumbent is like pedaling along on a lawn chair and zipadee-doodah on the downhills!! Enjoy the Voyage....Mark of the Dalton Boys


Offline Sailariel

A recumbant for centuries and possible touring
« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2006, 09:09:09 pm »
Mark, Looks like I`ll get my chance to really test a `bent. One of the guys in our club lent me his Burley Spider to try for as long as I want to. I`ll put my Look pedals on the bike and ride every day for a week. Then we`ll go from Belfast to Ellsworth and back--an even 100mi. I will take my cell phone in case I have to quit so that my wife can come and get me with the wagon. My friend is into the full race carbon bikes--a Colnago and a Bianchi, and seems to have lost interest in the Burley. Compared to the carbon bikes and my own Fuji, the Burley is quite heavy--but am probably comparing apples and pears.If I like the bike, I may try to buy it from him. I suspect he is interested in selling. Recumbents are very rare here in Maine. Will keep you posted. Alex