Author Topic: bike light  (Read 9451 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline jat

bike light
« on: October 30, 2006, 09:19:17 am »
need some feed back ..........thinking about buying DiNotte Ultra 3 bike light....anybody has anything to add that will influence me on why i should or not buy this light


Offline BrianCM

bike light
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2006, 04:54:22 pm »
Hi, Jat!  Most likely the reason nobody has replied to your post is because nobody here has had experience with that particular model of headlight.

The only things that influence my decisions in purchasing a light are brightness and burn time.  The DiNotte lights use rechargeable batteries, and the model you mention runs for only two hours at full brightness.  If that's enough time for you, then the light looks fine!  Make sure to break in the batteries according to their directions.

I use the Cateye EL500 (1-watt) because it has a long life.  I think that my next light will be a generator unit because of my long commute time.  The Busch & Müller DIWA Plus system has a tail light which changes brightness (and comes on when the headlight is off) when it senses you are stopping.

This message was edited by BrianCM on 10-30-06 @ 2:48 PM

Offline ptaylor

bike light
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2006, 05:07:15 pm »
Hi Jat.

I'm not familiar with this light. I did a brief search on the web, and couldn't find any specifics.

For what it's worth, let me tell you what I use, and you may be able to make some comparisons. I have had a Night Rider for about 6 years. The model I have has been replaced by the NightRider Classic, but the differences are mininal. http://www.niterider.com/prod_classic.shtml
I'm very happy with it, except the battery only lasts about 2 years, and replacements are expensive. My light is handlebar mount, which I prefer over a helmet mount, and is capable of 12 watts, 20 watts, or 32 watts. Twelve watts is normally ok, unless the pavement is wet, or your night vision is destroyed every block with a bright street light. When the pavement is wet, I use the 32 watts and wish I had more because I ride through a lot of glass on my commute.

One feature I love is the flashing mode. At dawn and dusk and in a rain,  I set my light to flash which makes me feel really secure.

Hope this helps - the most important thing is that you don't ride in the dark without some kind of light. Get the brightest tail light you can find too, if you don't already have one.

Paul
Paul

Offline RussellSeaton

bike light
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2006, 10:21:53 am »
I'll add some comments on lights.  I have several models.

1.  NiteRider HeadTrip helmet lights.  10 watt and 15 watt and the Digital HeadTrip.  Digital is crap.  The switch inside cuts the power to the light if its cold or whenever it feels like it.  NiteRider tried to fix it but it still has problems.  The regular on/off 10 watt and 15 watt work well.  About 2:20 run time with the 10 watt and 1:30 with the 15 watt.  I've acquired several light heads over the years.  10 watts is usually enough.  15 is nicer.  Battery packs are NiMH and last a couple years before needing their cells replaced.  Battery pack fits in a jersey pocket.  Interstate Battery store in town will do everything, including soldering the cells together and resoldering the wires, for $44.  Half the price of a new pack from NiteRider.  Performance Bike has the 10 watt HeadTrip on sale for $90 (before 20% off coupons) all the time.  Great deal.  Takes regular MR11 or something halogen bulbs so you could change the 10 watt to 12 or 15 or 20 or whatever.  Helmet lights are the greatest.  If you can only have one light, make it a helmet light.  You cannot see around turns or road signs with only a handlebar mounted light.  Handlebar lights only are dangerous.

2.  NiteRider 15 watt that fits on the handlebar.  Casts a flood beam instead of a spot beam like the HeadTrip models.  Battery pack is a water bottle size.  Runs 2:30.  Great light paired up with the spot beam of the HeadTrip.  No longer sold though.  About $150 or so 5 years or so ago.

3.  LED lights from Cateye.  I bought a bunch of these from Nashbar to test how bright they were.  Pitiful garbage.  Sent them all back.  Only good for complying with the letter of the law that says you much have front lights.  Junk lights.  I tried all the models from the EL-500 down to the EL-100 something.  All crap.

4.  Cateye Micro II Halogen.  About $8 on sale from Nashbar.  Pretty great light.  Uses 4 AA batteries and runs about 3 hours.  Need two of them.  If you need a light for cheap for a brevet, this is a good light.  Just carry some extra batteries and replace them in the middle of the night.  You will have to slow down on downhills because the light output is not that great but overall the light is so superior to all of those Cateye LEDs its amazing Cateye sells any of their LEDs.

5.  Nite Hawk Emillter.  Runs on 4 AA batteries in a pack in your jersey pocket.  Normal AA batteries found at any convenience store.  Runs 9+ hours.  1 watt LED.  Helmet or handlebar mount.  I have heard great things about this light and ordered some last week so no personal trial yet.  But after a long ride recently I need a helmet light to read cue sheets and road signs before sunrise and after sunset.  This one should work for that.  Maybe not good enough to use alone, but that is not why I want it.  Costs $60-80 at Nashbar depending on sales.

6.  Schmidt E6 primary and secondary 3 watt lights.  Driven by a front hub generator.  Shimano in my case but Schmidt also makes a nicer smoother less drag front generator hub.  Damned expensive.  Shimano generator wheel is about $200.  Schmidt generator wheel is about $330.  Each light is $100.  You can use up to two lights on the generator.  Mounting brackets for the lights are about $20 for each light.  $450-650 total.  BUT, the lights are great.  Nice rectangular narrow beam of light that really lights up the road.  Especially if you mount them low on the forks.  Bulbs do burn out too quickly.  $5 per bulb.  The secondary light does not add too much extra light so it could be left off, saving $120.  Lights are always ready to go.  Drag from generator wheel is always there too.  Shimano is worse than Schmidt.  Both have drag when lights are on.  For brevet riding, it is the system to get.  Even with the ridiculous cost.  You need a helmet light to see cue sheets and road signs.


Offline BrianCM

bike light
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2006, 11:53:03 pm »
I must say, I'm glad how bicycle headlight technology has improved.  The first headlight I bought for my bike over 10 years ago was a little halogen with 4-AA cells which gave me a scary 20-mile night commute.  The next one was a dual 10w/15w VistaLite with water-bottle-sized rechargeable battery, but I never used that on a commute because it didn't last long enough.  Then I bought the EL500, and it is bright enough for me, but I do use it in conjunction with a smaller second headlight.  (I have seen one guy around here riding with a 2D-cell flashlight clipped to his handlebars.)

Next year Busch & Muller is coming out with the Big Bang which is supposed to put out as much light as a car headlight.  Of course, the price is also a big bang at $900.


Offline DaveB

bike light
« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2006, 03:58:05 pm »
Takes regular MR11 or something halogen bulbs so you could change the 10 watt to 12 or 15 or 20 or whatever.

Most bike headlights have 6-volt batteries and the matching 6-volt MR-11 bulbs are typically only available from the light's manufacturer.  

Almost all of the MR-11 bulbs you find in home center or hardware stores are 12-volt. There are a few 12-volt bike lights but not many.  



Offline RussellSeaton

bike light
« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2006, 06:46:21 pm »
I wrote:
"Takes regular MR11 or something halogen bulbs so you could change the 10 watt to 12 or 15 or 20 or whatever."

DaveB wrote:
"Most bike headlights have 6-volt batteries and the matching 6-volt MR-11 bulbs are typically only available from the light's manufacturer.  

Almost all of the MR-11 bulbs you find in home center or hardware stores are 12-volt. There are a few 12-volt bike lights but not many."


MR-11 bulbs from the light manufacturer?  If you want to pay three times the price, yes you can buy them there.  Otherwise there are many places that sell all sizes of MR-11 bulbs.

5 or 20 watt 6 volt MR-11 lights.
http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=101&subcategory=1065&brand=&sku=8512&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=Shop%20by%20Subcat%3A%20Light%20Accessories

20 watt 12 volt MR-11 lights.
http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=101&subcategory=1065&brand=&sku=8512&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=Shop%20by%20Subcat%3A%20Light%20Accessories


6 volt lights.
http://www.1000bulbs.com/products.php?cat=6-Volt-MR11-Quartz-Halogen-Light-Bulbs

12 volt lights.
http://www.1000bulbs.com/products.php?cat=Front-Glass,-12-Volt-MR11,-Halogen-Light-Bulbs

6 volt lights.
http://www.purelandsupply.com/item.jhtml?UCIDs=714694%7C1107951&PRID=1369342




Offline erniegrillo

bike light
« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2006, 07:21:46 pm »
here's another option for lower cost bike lights.
www.batteryspace.com  I ordered camera batteries and a L-ion bike lite battery for my NiteRider light from them and have been very pleased with their products and service. Lots of info on their site and their bike light forums are very informative..


Offline DaveB

bike light
« Reply #8 on: November 02, 2006, 10:45:33 am »
Russell,

Well, the Nashbar bulbs are less expensive than the manufacturer's normal price but only at their sale price.  

However the other two 6V MR-11 sources are real finds and certainly offer bargain prices. I'd just caution buyers to be certain to get the glass-faced versions.

My point was that all of the MR-11 bulbs I've seen at Home Depot, Lowes, etc. were 12V bulbs.

This message was edited by DaveB on 11-2-06 @ 7:45 AM

Offline RussellSeaton

bike light
« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2006, 11:37:10 am »
"Well, the Nashbar bulbs are less expensive than the manufacturer's normal price but only at their sale price."

Being cheap I almost always buy stuff from Performance and Nashbar when the product is on sale AND I have a 10% or 15% or 20% off coupon.  And I also try to time it for one of the free shipping codes too.  There are very few bike items I need tomorrow that I cannot plan far enough ahead and wait until the right price is found.


Offline Sailariel

bike light
« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2006, 12:09:09 pm »
I mounted a Hella Led on my left fork leg-Low. Whenever I ride, it is on in flash mode. I also run a red flasher in the back--also always on. A Dayglo red ribbon-the stuff construction people wrap around about a foot long and the most garish jersey imaginable finish the "uniform" Admittedly the streamer may look a bit dorkey, but my close encounters with my four and eighteen wheeled fellow travelers has diminished a whole lot. I am still looking for a decent headlight. Any night riding I do now is on lit city streets so what I have now works. Best Regards, Alex