Author Topic: Building a Thorn Nomad  (Read 7955 times)

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Offline ragincajun

Building a Thorn Nomad
« on: January 19, 2007, 01:55:49 pm »
I just ordered a Thorn Nomad from SJS Cycles in the UK.  I purchased the frame only and wanted some oppinions for the best crank, shifter and brake combinations.  I like drop bars and really plan mostly road use.   I will be on long tours and want high end, reliable components.  Does anyone have any experience with components that not only function well, but make for a really nice ride on this particular frame?  I know that I will need a triple crank for sure.Text


Offline DaveB

Building a Thorn Nomad
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2007, 03:00:38 pm »
What kind of terrain do you expect top ride on and how heavy will your loads be on tour?  

If you are only going to ride in moderate hills and carry a modest load, a road triple such as Shimano Ultegra or what ever Campy now calls their top Triple group with a 12x27 or 13x29 cassette should do fine.  

If you are going to carry massive loads up big mountains than an MTB group such as Shimano XT with a MTB crank and something like a 11x32 or 11x34 cassette will likely work better. You will need a road front derailleur if you mate the MTB stuff with STI shifters.  Barcons will shift anything in front.


Offline bruno

Building a Thorn Nomad
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2007, 03:16:38 pm »
maybe a rohloff spped hub? thorns are chill bikes for sure! i'm putting a rohloff on a surly karate monkey.


Offline ragincajun

Building a Thorn Nomad
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2007, 03:17:31 pm »
Dave,

Thanks for the reply.  I don't plan on carrying massive loads up Mountains, but I am touring the Grand Canyon area for about 2 weeks this summer.

I am looking at the Shimano XTR gruppo Shifters, Derailleurs, Crank and Avid Mechanical Disc brakes.  I am putting on a Jones H Bar http://www.jonesbikes.com/update/hbar/fs_setup.html
My only concern, due to lack of experience with Mountain gearing, is that I'll wind up with gear ranges that are too low for long touring.  If it is suitable, fine that is what I'll order.  Do you have any oppinions on using the entire XTR Group for a touring rig?


Offline ragincajun

Building a Thorn Nomad
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2007, 03:24:04 pm »
Bruno,

I love Surly as well! They make great frames.  My Nomad can't take a Rohloff. (well, it could but it would be a mess running the cables)  They just did come out with a Nomad that's Rohloff equipped but it cost's as much as my daughter's car. :8o:


Offline DaveB

Building a Thorn Nomad
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2007, 05:12:14 pm »
XTR should make a great touring group if the expense isn't an issue.  

Using a 44T big chainring and an 11xXX cassette will give you a 108 gear-inch high gear which is identical to a 52x13 so that should be more than adequate unless you insist on pedaling down big hills.  

You will also have a very low low gear either 22x32 (18.5 gear-inches) or 22x34 (17.4 gear-inches)depending on the cassette you choose which should get you up anything!

Summary, XTR will cover about any conditions you are likely to face.

The Grand Canyon area is at 7500' at the South Rim and about 8500' at the North rim so the altitude makes it feel harder.  And, while the climbs aren't real steep, they can be very long.  


Offline ragincajun

Building a Thorn Nomad
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2007, 06:41:52 pm »
Thanks Dave! You have confirmed what I was hoping to hear.  I have talked to others (mountain bikers) who had great things to say about those components as well.  Money is an issue, but I swear I'm going to sell my car soon and start to simplify my life!

I will be at the South rim some time in May.  It sounds like you have been there.  Were you part of an organized tour or did you go it alone?

 


Offline DaveB

Building a Thorn Nomad
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2007, 07:14:51 pm »
I've been to the South Rim three times over the past 40 years all on family vacations.  The last time we were there was three years ago and I had my bike with me.

I rode from our motel just outside the park entrance to the Grand Canyon Village and several points on the rim.  From the hotel to the rim was a real slog and I was wondering why I was so slow.  The way back to the hotel was REAL fast so I had been going up a slight grade all the way in without it being obvious from the landscape. The altitude does have a noticable effect on us low-landers too so be ready to go a lot slower than you normally expect.

BTW, the entire area is staggeringly beautiful.  The Grand Canyon is impressive beyond belief and no amount of seeing photos or films of it can prepare you for the real thing.  I envy you.    


Offline ragincajun

Building a Thorn Nomad
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2007, 07:34:26 pm »
Whoops! I had not considered the altitude. I know the bike can handle it but it's rider better hit the hills soon.  

I'll have Continental Top Touring, probably 37's so I hope it proves to be a good choice.

Cheers! :)