Author Topic: Question about Scansium 7000  (Read 8224 times)

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Offline Sailariel

Question about Scansium 7000
« on: May 15, 2007, 03:40:17 pm »
I recently found a 57cm Easton frame made of Scandium 7000. It is a racing frame that was never set up--exceptionally light--2 1/2Lbs. I stripped down my Fuji and put the 105 Grouppo on the Easton along with Ritchey DS-Pro wheels, Salsa drop bars, Ritchey seatpost, and a Truvativ Elita Triple ISIS with an FSA Platinum Pro BB. I also got an Easton EC-90 carbon fork and a Cane Creek Solo headset. I am currently shaking the bike down making minor adjustments. I have been researching Easton and Scandium on the internet and have gotten some answers albeit vague ones. The frame was appearently built for some labor union team, since it has decals that say Labor Power and some sort of reference to asbestoes lung disease. There is no serial number anywhere on the frame except for a stamping that says "JOHN-E". I am very happy with the bike. It is exceptionally smooth, does not have the harsh and twitchy ride the aluminum Fuji had, and handles much better. The oversteer the Fuji had is gone and I feel much safer cornering. I was just wondering if anyone on this forum might know something about this bike. It is Italian Racing Red with "Easton" decal on the downtube in 2" black letters, and other assorted Easton decals elsewhere on the frame. Any help would be greatly appreciated.


Offline wanderingwheel

Question about Scansium 7000
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2007, 04:50:41 pm »
Scandium is a type of aluminum alloy produced by Easton.  To make "Scandium", they add a little (fractions of a percent) elemental scandium to a more common aluminum mix, in this case I believe it is bsed on a 7000-series aluminum.  Scandium makes the alloy a little stronger, so the tubes can be drawn thinner, resulting in a lighter bike with the same strength.  The difference is very small but ti is heavily marketed.  Some people cal it "Scamdium" since Scandium bikes are often sold for my times the price of nearly identical 7005 aluminum bikes.

Labor Power is a very strong southern California masters racing team.  I think it is sponsored by a group that represents many labor unions, and a lawyer who specializes in mesothelioma (lung cancer).  Thebike was most likely custom-made for "John-E" ( I'm not sure who that actually is, maybe John Wike) by either an Asian custom shop outsourced by Easton, or local custom builder Russ Denny.  I would lean slightly toward Russ Denny as the builder.

Sounds like a fun bike.

Sean


Offline Sailariel

Question about Scansium 7000
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2007, 04:54:23 pm »
Sean, Thanks a million for the comeback. I am really enjoying the bike. The cockpit measurement is still not perfect but a new stem will solve that problem. The bike is a real eyecatcher and people can`t believe how light it is. I think I`ll put a lot of miles on this bike.


Offline Sailariel

Question about Scansium 7000
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2007, 11:59:47 pm »
Sean, Did some more research. Seems that the bike was built by Russ Denny. I`m getting a new stem for a better fit. The bike is a pure joy to ride. It has literally given me a whole new dimension.


Offline Sailariel

Question about Scansium 7000
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2007, 10:46:22 pm »
Sean, You were right. Got word back from Easton and the bike was made by Russ Denny in 2004. There were 20 bikes built. According to Easton, there are quite a few still racing. My frame was never set up-- so it is in effect a new frame. I have finished setting it up and am amazed at what this bike can do. I did a descent the other day and hit 60mph. there was no shimmy and the bike tracked beautifully. The only problem was that my eyes watered. Am really enjoying the bike. Thanks for steering my research in the right direction.


Offline wanderingwheel

Question about Scansium 7000
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2007, 01:54:36 pm »
Glad I was able to help.  He may not be well known outside of the elite racers in southern California, but a Russ Denny race bike is a special thing.  I'm not sure how he is with touring bikes, but he certainly knows how to make a bike that wants to go fast.  If you look closely through the socal peloton, you will see many of his bikes, especially under the faster racers and not always with his decals.

Sean


Offline Sailariel

Question about Scansium 7000
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2007, 10:23:34 pm »
Wandering Wheel, I have a touring bike-a converted Miyata Cross 100 which I use day in day out for errands, grocery shopping, etc. The Easton (Russ Denny) is an absolute blast to ride. The original came with all Campy components. My frame was never set up. I equipped the bike with 105 components, a really good ISIS BB, and a Truvativ Elita triple. The whole package is finished off with Ritchey DS-Pro aero wheels and LOOK Keo pedals. We will see how she does in my first ever time trial this weekend. The next weekend we will be doing The Trek Across Maine- a 187mi three day event of some super hilly terrain. I think the bike will shine. Two weeks after that we will be doing the MS-150. This bike is definitely getting the workout it was built for.


Offline Sailariel

Question about Scansium 7000
« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2007, 11:19:29 am »
I have been looking for Russ Denny bicycles all over the internet. It`s almost like he fell off the face of the earth. I was hoping to find some examples of his work but have not been very sucessful. Of course, my computer skills are primitive, at best.


Offline rdbikes

Question about Scansium 7000
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2007, 04:59:09 pm »
Sailariel,
We are currently updating our website. If you have any questions about our bikes please contact us at our email..
rdbikes@yahoo.com or you can reach us at 951-652-6268
Thanks,
Russ Denny Bicycles


Offline Sailariel

Question about Scansium 7000
« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2007, 08:46:07 pm »
Thank you for the comeback. I will DEFINITELY contact you.  Alex