Author Topic: Rain Gear  (Read 9360 times)

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Offline juswalkin

Rain Gear
« on: August 24, 2007, 06:55:57 pm »
I'm going on a three day tour in Washington State and most probably will get in some rain. Anyone have good experance with rain gear wile riding in the hills and not getting soaked from the inside from sweat. Thanks Don


Offline ptaylor

Rain Gear
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2007, 12:24:18 pm »
I suppose some of us sweat more than others, but I don't think it is possible to stay dry when it's raining.

When I commute, I use a rain poncho, specially made for bicycling, from Campmor. ACA has a similar one, but since it does not have a hood, it is of little value. I like it because it has excellent ventilation and keeps everything relatively dry, except for my feet. The downside is that it catches a lot of wind.

I also take this cape on tours, unless I'm expecting a lot of cold rain. If you're going through the Cascades, you may want something more substantial (rain jacket, pants, long finger gloves). In direct answer to your query, I don't think it is possible to stay dry. Period. My goal is to stay warm, and hope I can dry out in a day or so.

Enjoy your ride!

Paul
Paul

Offline JimF

Rain Gear
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2007, 03:29:33 pm »
Another cape to look at:  http://www.bicycleclothing.com/Rain-Capes.html

I used it across country, with a number of rains. The cape design mitigates the perspiration effect. Kept the upper body reasonably dry. Enjoy.


Offline dombrosk

Rain Gear
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2007, 05:18:56 pm »
Paul makes a good point, the issue is not so much staying dry as staying warm.  Just about any raingear can keep you warm as you ride.  When you stop for a break, then it's important to be mostly dry under your raingear to avoid chilling too much.

I've had great experience with the combination of a jacket in EVent fabric (mine is Pearl Izumi, but others sell them, including the Adventure Cycling store) and Marmot Precip pants.  My wife got the full-zip pants for horseback riding (boots), but I think those are too heavy for biking, and my quarter zip pants are easy to get on and off over bike shoes.

I rode the Northern Tier in this combination through 4 days of cold rain in Idaho/Montana and was a very happy camper.

Some kind of shoe covers are important, too... one mistake I'll only make once is tucking my rainpants into my shoe covers!

A great trick for drying things out at night is to pick up a local newspaper and tuck some loosely into your damp shoes--- somehow the newspaper draws the moisture out of the shoes.

Last thought I have is that long-fingered gloves are great for northern riding in the rain, it's amazing how cold those brake levers can get without them.

Have a great ride!



Offline driftlessregion

Rain Gear
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2007, 07:24:08 pm »
For light rain, light weight, and low price,  02 raingear is good and found in many bike shops and http://www.rainshield.com/p_cycling.html.  For top shelf you can't beat Showers Pass (http://www.showerspass.com/) or Gore (http://www.gorebikewear.com/index2.html).


Offline ptaylor

Rain Gear
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2007, 11:05:32 pm »
JimF.

Thanks for the link. But this cape has the same shortcomings as the ACA cape - no hood.

Paul
Paul

Offline driftlessregion

Rain Gear
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2007, 11:15:18 pm »
Actually one of the 02 jackets does have a hood. However, I don't like hoods and I'd rather either use a shower cap (dime store for a buck or so, and great patterns!) which gives my better peripheral vision, or none at all if it is warm out.


Offline juswalkin

Rain Gear
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2007, 12:12:39 am »
Thanks for so much info. I'll check out the sites and will  be picking up some gear before the ride. Thanks again Don


Offline gponce101

Rain Gear
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2007, 12:04:31 am »
http://www.showewrspass.com

Used this gear on Cycle Utah tour in 2006 rain/sleet/snow at 10000 plus
feet at Cedar Breaks and it performed wonderfully.


Offline RussellSeaton

Rain Gear
« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2007, 12:24:23 pm »
I agree with staying warm.  Or warm enough.  Not dry.

Just did a ride in France with cool temps, 50s, at night and cool temps in the day, 60s.  Plenty of rain off and on.  Clothes were wet the entire ride.  Used a short sleeve jersey and long sleeve jersy under a wind breaker jacket (like Pearl Izumi Zephyr) the first night.  And leg warmers.  I was cooler than I prefer but not dangerously cold.  Then I used the Showers Pass Event rain jacket from then on during the day and night.  Short sleeve and long sleeve jerseys and leg warmers stayed on.  Heavier rain jacket added more warmth than the wind breaker jacket.  Tended to get hotter in the heavy rain jacket when the weather was sort of nice for a few miles.  But being a little hot is better than being a lot cold.

In June I came down Loveland Pass in Colorado in the rain, snow, wind, 30s-40s temps.  After getting soaked the last few miles to the top in the rain and snow.  And stopping at the top to put on arm and leg warmers and balaclava and gloves.  Used short sleeve jersey, wind breaker jacket, balaclava, arm and leg warmers, long fingered liner gloves.  Just warm enough with these clothes going down the 8-9 miles in the rain, wind, snow to make it.  Soaking wet of course.  But barely warm enough for pretty extreme conditions.  A friend used his Showers Pass Event heavy rain jacket, heavy gloves, tights, etc. and was more than OK on the same descent.


Offline MichaelTheWingN

Rain Gear
« Reply #10 on: September 04, 2007, 01:16:13 pm »
Six of one or a half dozen of the other, you ride your bike, you are going to sweat. If you use a strictly coated nylon or equivalent, you are going to retain it all, moisture and heat. You can to a certain extent minimize that with ventilation such as pit zips and what not. The other alternative, and it is expensive, is GoreTex. It is a water proof material that will allow breath ability and allow moisture to escape. The cost between the two is about $100 for coated nylon and pit zips and $400 for GoreTex.

Beyond that, you are going to get wet from sweat, but as long as you are warm it's all good!

Have a good ride!

Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. Mark Twain
Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. Mark Twain

Offline staehpj1

Rain Gear
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2007, 12:25:37 pm »
I am in the plain old coated nylon camp.  I'm not crazy about any of the breathable garments that I have tried.  I find that I am almost as wet with Goretex and if it is cold I am colder with Goretex than with a non-breathable garment.

If it isn't too cold I prefer to just get rained on and wet.