Author Topic: Sore butts  (Read 26481 times)

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Offline bogiesan

Sore butts
« Reply #15 on: June 04, 2008, 11:17:12 pm »
> I have heard recumbents are hard on hills.

There are silly myths about any type of bike. Riding a bike is fun for
me, it's not about getting to the top of the hill before someone who
has 30 years and 30 pounds on me.

I use a Macintosh because it's a fun and engaging machine. My PC just
makes me angry.
I play go because compared to go's 10 to the 36th power possible
games chess is literally predictable.
I ride a recumbent because when I'm done with a century I'm as tired as
everyone else is but nothing on my body hurts. Not a thing. That's
become gloriously important to me as I've gotten older.

But the main reason I play go instead of chess, use a Mac instead of a
widows device, and ride a recumbent is simple: almost no one else
does any of those things.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline bjshred

Sore butts
« Reply #16 on: June 16, 2008, 12:08:26 am »
Last winter I experienced the same thing as I started putting on miles for this summers touring season.  Tried new saddle, etc.  Was considering new bike when I had the thought I need a recumbent trike.  I had been watching them on web sites for a while.  I called Terra Trike and have been a happy rider since my Tour arrived in a huge box 8 weeks ago.  All I had to do was add air to tires.  I go 20-30 3 days a week and 50+ on Saturday.  No sore butt, neck or numb hands and fingers.  It climbs hills so steep that traction is the biggest problem I have to deal with.  I love being able to go slowly and not lose my balance on steep hills.  No worries about losing balance on graveled corners.  It has been the solution to all the things plaguing me except a pitifully underpowered engine.


Offline staehpj1

Sore butts
« Reply #17 on: June 16, 2008, 10:37:11 am »
Bike fit, riding position, and time in the saddle are the answers.  Going to a recumbent should not be required.  If you want one fine, but don't let the bent riders convince you it is the only way.


Offline Tourista829

Re: Sore butts
« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2009, 11:37:01 pm »
I know it was awhile ago, but I was curious how you made out with your sore butt? Did you find a saddle that worked? I had a similiar problem. I solved my problem when I replaced my bike and saddle. I have a new bike that fits me perfect, went to a Brooks Saddle (which required a break in period), and got out of the saddle more. I rode 72 miles and did not experience much pain. Now I know why Brooks has been in business forever. I couldn't believe that a harder leather saddle worked for me.

Offline whittierider

Re: Sore butts
« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2009, 01:59:30 pm »
Quote
Quote
I have heard recumbents are hard on hills.

There are silly myths about any type of bike.

like that wedgies can't be comfortable and leave you totally pain-free at the end of 100 miles or more, as is my case.  I'm 49.  I do however have a childhood neck injury that keeps me off a recumbent.  I can't even travel in a car for an hour without getting a bad headache unless I take a load of aspirin first.  I do think the recumbent tricycle with two wheels in the front and one in back would open up a lot of possibilities for older people, especially ones with balance problems or who are afraid of falling.

Quote
I use a Macintosh because it's a fun and engaging machine.  My PC just makes me angry.

My PC always made me angry too, until I quit using Windows and buggy Microsoft software.  I use Linux now, and although it hasn't been all smooth-sailing, I've only had a small fraction as many problems, never have to de-frag or worry about viruses, I go months without re-booting, and it's much, much cheaper than either of the other major alternatives.  And, unlike MS, the Linux software suppliers have no big-brother tactics.

Quote
I've never understood why the few milliimeters of padding in most bike shorts would make a difference in cushioning when it's compressed by anybody who weighs more than a few tens of pounds.

If someone could figure out how make the shorts in the right shape without seams, and guarantee that you wouldn't sit on wrinkles, I suppose we wouldn't need padding.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2009, 02:01:13 pm by whittierider »

Offline Sectrix

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Re: Sore butts
« Reply #20 on: January 25, 2009, 04:48:34 pm »
I would second the Brooks saddle. I haven't used one, but it makes sense. If they have been making the same saddle for over 100 years, they must be doing something right. Sheldon Brown (I believe) also suggested Brooks. He said out of 42 distance riders he saw on one journey, 30 of them used Brooks.

Then again, I really don't get sore butt anymore on my cheapo Schwinn WTB saddle.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Sore butts
« Reply #21 on: January 26, 2009, 10:13:04 am »
It's all about fit and saddle, unless you as an individual are particularly sensitive. But I will tell you what. Sometimes discomfort may come to the hands and posterior because they are not used to the pressure. After a while on a long tour those pressure points become used to it, and the discomfort goes away. I have a cheap Wal Mart saddle. It is called a mountain bike saddle, and I cannot for the life of me figure out how it got such a name. It is narrow with thin to moderate padding with an open space for minimizing pressure in the crotch/genitilia area. It is comfortable. Do not think that just because a saddle has foam or gel and is thick that it will necessarly be comfortable. Look at the pictures on crazyguyonabike.com. Do you see everybody using super thick, highly padded saddles? No, you do not. Some of those saddles are thin, narrow, and seemingly hard. You have to get a saddle that is right for you. Once you have the right saddle, you will be able to spend much more time cycling, and a lot less time off the bike and waiting for the soreness to subside. I think in your case it might only be a matter of having the right gear.

Offline centrider

Re: Sore butts
« Reply #22 on: February 21, 2009, 08:10:34 pm »
I would second the Brooks saddle. I haven't used one, but it makes sense. If they have been making the same saddle for over 100 years, they must be doing something right. Sheldon Brown (I believe) also suggested Brooks. He said out of 42 distance riders he saw on one journey, 30 of them used Brooks.

Then again, I really don't get sore butt anymore on my cheapo Schwinn WTB saddle.

I use a Brooks B-17 on my CoMotion Nor'Wester.  It's taken a couple of years to break in, but this year is the first in which I haven't had a sore where I usually get one, such that I regularly used a gel band-aid.  Bag Balm never worked for me, but the large gel bandage did when it was placed over the wound.  The bandage if applied properly would stay on for a week.  Applied incorrectly its like sitting on a stone. 

I also see a dermatologist regularly as we attempt to solve the problem. 

I also found that the shorts have to fit you.  They can't be too large or you'll slide around inside and eventually abraid the skin.

The pad might seem like a cushion, but its primary function is to absorb sweat. 

Offline wildandcrazy

Re: Sore butts
« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2009, 11:03:54 am »
Here's my 2 cents.  Been on two 1000 mile tours so far.  The bike's fit is extremely important.  One half inch, one way on another, up or down, forward or back, and a few degrees of tilt can make a huge difference.  Get the fit right first, but don't be afraid to tinker with it.  Things change over time.  You can gain/lose weight or become more flexible.  You can spend all kinds of time and money trying to find the perfect saddle.  Just as a Brooks has a break in time, so does your butt.  The more you ride, the more comfortable you become.  Keep extending your distance, but give yourself enough recovery time between rides.  Your butt will adapt.  On our tours, my wife and I wear ordinary shorts and use the stock saddles that come with Trek 520s.  Our butts may be tender for the first few rides of the season, but quickly adjust.  We do use Ex-Officio underware and it makes a big difference.

Offline johnsondasw

Re: Sore butts
« Reply #24 on: February 25, 2009, 12:49:11 am »
In my 50 years of riding, I've found that there are several ways to mitigate the problem: good fit, expensive shorts ($100 or so), change position often (especially some stand up time), good saddle, chamois butter and take a break once in a while to enjoy other forms of exercise.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline mucknort

Re: Sore butts
« Reply #25 on: February 25, 2009, 03:47:13 pm »
In my 50 years of riding, I've found that there are several ways to mitigate the problem: good fit, expensive shorts ($100 or so), change position often (especially some stand up time), good saddle, chamois butter and take a break once in a while to enjoy other forms of exercise.

One half inch, one way on another, up or down, forward or back, and a few degrees of tilt can make a huge difference.  Get the fit right first, but don't be afraid to tinker with it.  Things change over time.  You can gain/lose weight or become more flexible.  You can spend all kinds of time and money trying to find the perfect saddle.  Just as a Brooks has a break in time, so does your butt.

...or try a recumbent.

Bike fit, riding position, and time in the saddle are the answers.  Going to a recumbent should not be required.  If you want one fine, but don't let the bent riders convince you it is the only way.

I just don't get the resistance to a recumbent. No, it's not the "only way", but after years of trying the tinkering, adjusting, and "time in the saddle" that the above members suggested I tried a recumbent and all the pains disappeared. And it wasn't just the "groin/butt" pain that went away. So did the wrist pain and the neck pain. On a recumbent you are sitting in the same position as in a chair or in a car. Your body is aimed at things ahead of you, not at the ground. Yes, there are many types of recumbents (long wheel base, short wheel base, high racer, low racer, delta trikes, tadpole trikes, etc.) Maybe someone like staehpj1 tried a style of recumbent once that didn't suit his/her style. To me they are the ultimate touring bike, to others maybe not.

I can sort of understand the resistance to recumbents from the under 30, got to look cool, racer crowd that reads Bicycling magazine, but I don't get the resistance from long distance riders on this site. Many people abandon bicycle riding due to the pain. My opinion is that many would continue riding if they tried a recumbent style.

Adventure Cycling's current campaign motto is: HELP US INSPIRE OTHERS TO TRAVEL BY BICYCLE. Encouraging folks to find the "perfect fit" to make a diamond frame/upright style bike more comfortable may work for some. Others may be inspired to ride with something like a recumbent style bike.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2009, 06:25:00 pm by mucknort »

Offline Tourista829

Re: Sore butts
« Reply #26 on: February 25, 2009, 10:09:19 pm »
Mucknort,

Although I love my new Comotion, I believe that a recumbent may be in the future for me. We have a very good dealer in Plant City, Fl., Power On Cycling.  Everyone I speak to, at their shop, is very high on them. Besides the pain issues, one of the owners just broke a record 170 miles in 12 hours. She is closer to my 57 years. Now I realize we are in Florida but still we do have winds, it is growing on me and others I speak to.

Offline mucknort

Re: Sore butts
« Reply #27 on: February 25, 2009, 10:21:51 pm »
Mucknort,

Although I love my new Comotion, I believe that a recumbent may be in the future for me. We have a very good dealer in Plant City, Fl., Power On Cycling. 
Tourista829,
I have made numerous purchases from the good folks at Power On Cycling over the internet. You are fortunate to be near them (I live in New England) and I highly recommend them!!!

Offline johnsondasw

Re: Sore butts
« Reply #28 on: February 25, 2009, 11:55:19 pm »
Recumbents may be in my future.  I think they look really cool--as cool or cooler than traditional bikes.  The one thing I wonder about is visibility on the road, especially in city/high traffic areas.  Is it an issue with you bent riders?  It seems they are way lower and would be harder for drivers to see.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline centrider

Re: Sore butts
« Reply #29 on: February 26, 2009, 01:39:56 am »
In my 50 years of riding, I've found that there are several ways to mitigate the problem: good fit, expensive shorts ($100 or so), change position often (especially some stand up time), good saddle, chamois butter and take a break once in a while to enjoy other forms of exercise.

One half inch, one way on another, up or down, forward or back, and a few degrees of tilt can make a huge difference.  Get the fit right first, but don't be afraid to tinker with it.  Things change over time.  You can gain/lose weight or become more flexible.  You can spend all kinds of time and money trying to find the perfect saddle.  Just as a Brooks has a break in time, so does your butt.

...or try a recumbent.

Bike fit, riding position, and time in the saddle are the answers.  Going to a recumbent should not be required.  If you want one fine, but don't let the bent riders convince you it is the only way.

I just don't get the resistance to a recumbent. No, it's not the "only way", but after years of trying the tinkering, adjusting, and "time in the saddle" that the above members suggested I tried a recumbent and all the pains disappeared. And it wasn't just the "groin/butt" pain that went away. So did the wrist pain and the neck pain. On a recumbent you are sitting in the same position as in a chair or in a car. Your body is aimed at things ahead of you, not at the ground. Yes, there are many types of recumbents (long wheel base, short wheel base, high racer, low racer, delta trikes, tadpole trikes, etc.) Maybe someone like staehpj1 tried a style of recumbent once that didn't suit his/her style. To me they are the ultimate touring bike, to others maybe not.

I can sort of understand the resistance to recumbents from the under 30, got to look cool, racer crowd that reads Bicycling magazine, but I don't get the resistance from long distance riders on this site. Many people abandon bicycle riding due to the pain. My opinion is that many would continue riding if they tried a recumbent style.

Adventure Cycling's current campaign motto is: HELP US INSPIRE OTHERS TO TRAVEL BY BICYCLE. Encouraging folks to find the "perfect fit" to make a diamond frame/upright style bike more comfortable may work for some. Others may be inspired to ride with something like a recumbent style bike.

Well, I certainly don't look down on anyone riding a recombinant.  I almost bought one last year.  I was (and maybe still am) interested in a tryke.  The Australian one, name escapes me now.

However, I travel during the summer I'm in my Prius which has a hitch rack.  Getting a tryke onto or into the Prius seems to be at this time insurmountable.  And in the fall I'm back East.  The CoMotion was a perfect solution to traveling by air.