Author Topic: Good Rear derailer for touring  (Read 21376 times)

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Offline paddleboy17

Re: Good Rear derailer for touring
« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2009, 11:28:32 am »
I was under the impression that I could fit a 24t sprocket on the FSA.  I chose 3 new chain rings 48-36-24 to replace the OEM 50-39-30.  I think this will get me in the ballpark for a good climbing gear......24 front 27 rear.....that works out to 24 gear inches....Not that bad even for the Appalachians.

That sounds expensive (was it?).  A new LX crank is $180.  You may have to move the front derailleur down the tube a bit to work with the smaller gear rings.

There was an earlier reference to Interlock Racing Designs 10-speed Cassettes.  I finally looked these up.  They will indeed give you mountain bike gearing for a 10 speed system.  I cannot comment on how light they are or how well they are made.  They are a little pricey, but spider based cassettes are expensive.

One thing to look out for on your tour.  I have the impression that 10 speed chains are not as tough as 9 speed chains.  Perhaps someone else can comment on this.  I would bring a chain gauge with you and check for wear.  Replace your chain early, especially if you invest in aftermarket cassettes.  If the chain stretches and wears out other components, getting replacements will slow you up.
Danno

Offline staehpj1

Re: Good Rear derailer for touring
« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2009, 12:32:45 pm »
I was under the impression that I could fit a 24t sprocket on the FSA.  I chose 3 new chain rings 48-36-24 to replace the OEM 50-39-30.  I think this will get me in the ballpark for a good climbing gear......24 front 27 rear.....that works out to 24 gear inches....Not that bad even for the Appalachians.
You are correct about a 24t fitting.  My mistake, sorry for the confusion.  I did not know it had a 74bcd inner.

24 gear inches isn't exactly a stump puller, but you may find it satisfactory.  I had a 21.9 when I did the TA and it was barely adequate.  I was wishing for lower a few places in the Appalachians and Ozarks, but was happy in the Cascades and Rockies.  Some people find a 22 34 a necessity and some ride road gearing.  I will say that the one guy we met on the TA that had road gearing was the first to the top of the climbs in Oregon.  Unfortunately he also went home only about 800 miles into the TA due to knee problems and wound up requiring surgery and losing most of a year of riding.