Author Topic: Cannondale Quick  (Read 2707 times)

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Offline curdog

Cannondale Quick
« on: September 27, 2009, 01:46:09 pm »
I have a Cannondale Quick, which is generally marketed as a hybrid. I was wondering if this would be sufficient for the C&O. Would I need stronger wheels? The bike currently is set up with 700X 32's.
Thanks for your comments.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2009, 08:30:57 am by curdog »

Offline BMartindale

Re: Cannondale Quick
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2009, 11:48:24 am »
I have a Cannondale Quick, which is generally marketed as a hybrid. I was wondering if this would be sufficient for the C&O. Would I need stronger wheels? The bike currently is set up with 700X 32's.
Thanks for your comments.

The Quick should be OK for the C+O.  They make several different models and they all seem to use conventionally spoked wheels until you get to the spendier ones, but even those seem fairly robust.  Wheel stress is a function of total weight of the rider and of the gear, so if you are riding pretty heavy, you may see value to some 36 holers.  If you are riding unladen, then the stock wheels should fine.

paps2010

  • Guest
Re: Cannondale Quick
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2010, 01:24:23 am »
The Quick 8 is a versatile bike that's best suited to the hurly-burly of the day-to-day commute. While its eight-speed hub gear limits its long-distance credentials, it does make it an attractive option for the 'greasophobe'. There's a dash of fun in there too for messing about on towpaths and hardpacked trails at the weekend.

    * Frame: Cannondale do good alloy – 6061 neatly finished and pretty smooth (8/10)
    * Handling: Good around town – nippy and accurate. Sharp response adds enjoyment (8/10)
    * Equipment: Nexus hub is great for commuting but isn’t as versatile once the distance and gradient increases. Own-brand kit does the job (7/10)
    * Wheels: Built for everyday strength and reliability rather than outright speed (7/10)

For actual speed, the Quick is hampered by its relative sparsity of gears. Hub gears, like the eight-speed Shimano Nexus here, are finding their way onto more and more affordable urban runabouts and if you don’t want to get your hands dirty then they make a lot of sense. They also make a lot of sense if your riding tends to be stop-start – being able to change while standing still is a proper bonus.

The eight speeds offered by the Nexus should prove enough to those living in all but the hilliest areas, but if you’re used to more then you’ll likely find them a bit gappy and spend a lot of time twisting the bar-mounted shifter to find the right ratio.  Also, as with any hub gear, there’s a weight penalty.

The back wheel of the Quick weighs almost 3.5kg and to anyone used to a traditional rear end, it feels as if it needs more of an effort from standstill to get moving. Once going though, the 36-spoke three-cross pattern wheels roll smoothly and the chunky tyres help soak up bumps.

As well as an aluminium frame, the Cannondale also has an aluminium fork, the Fatty. While this doesn't have the same road buzz-damping properties as a carbon fork, the bike is still comfortable enough for most townscapes.
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Irrelevant commercial link removed by F L Hiltz
« Last Edit: December 14, 2010, 07:17:39 am by FredHiltz »