Author Topic: Great Divide South-North  (Read 5262 times)

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Offline Macbeth

Great Divide South-North
« on: January 09, 2010, 09:44:00 pm »

 Adam again from Australia here...........

 It is seeming that, logistically, because I have family friends in Texas that'll drive me around, it may be much easier for me to start the Great Divide at the Southern end.... Also, from looking at many peoples photo galleries from the trip, it appears to me that finishing in New Mexico may be something of an anticlimax after the sights of the trip (correct me if I am wrong here, please) whereas finishing in the Banff seems a beautiful end.....

 I have been reading a lot of peoples experiences, and have not yet some across any that have ridden South-North..... Just wondering, is there a particular reason for this? I am certain it gets colder as you head further North, which I guess means you need to start earlier.... Any other fundamental reason that most ride North-South...

 Thanks again in advance for answers.

 Adam

Offline JimF

Re: Great Divide South-North
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2010, 11:46:19 am »
Adam:
Take a look at http://www.topofusion.com/divide/ . Scott and his wife did the GD south to north, mapping it for GPS and did a detailed journal. Nice job. Did you search crazyguyonabike.com for a S to N journal? Good luck with your planning.

Offline Cyclesafe

Re: Great Divide South-North
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2010, 05:09:33 pm »
http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=RrzKj&doc_id=4221&v=Kd

I'm leaving Banff on June 23.  If you leave Antelope Wells on June 1 we'll meet in Bannock State Park in Wyoming.

South to North is very doable.  It's a little steeper and you have to avoid getting to the higher elevations too early, before the snow has stopped blocking the roads.

Offline MrBent

Re: Great Divide South-North
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2010, 10:58:09 pm »
Starting in the south my have some real advantages, not the least of which is avoiding the hottest part of the ride.  Also, water should be more available generally.  As noted, the main issue is snow at high altitudes.  NM is one of the longest states, so that gives you time before hitting Colorado with the highest passes.  This year is looking to be a big snow year, so figure this into your calculations as to when you start.  I haven't done it, bit I've often thought that starting in NM in late May/early June.

Have a great time!

Scott

Offline Macbeth

Re: Great Divide South-North
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2010, 07:40:17 am »

 Thanks everyone.....

 Scott, could you clarify what you mean by water being more available.....???

 Looking at your warm months in 2011 for this one, off to Japan this year, bu tlike to be on top of research....

 Adam

Offline Cyclesafe

Re: Great Divide South-North
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2010, 07:20:09 pm »
In several places water for at least two days needs to be carried.  For the rest of the route you can purify surface water.

Offline John Nettles

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Re: Great Divide South-North
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2010, 12:05:44 am »

 ....could you clarify what you mean by water being more available.....???

 Adam

In May or June the hot part of the summer in New Mexico has not totally kicked in yet.  Therefore, there may still be small areas of surface water (streams, small ponds, puddles, etc.)  of water where you can stop and refill (be sure to purify it).  Later in July & August when it is really hot out, all surface water sources have most likely dried up so you must carry a lot of water for up to two days or future riders will pass a skeleton next to a bike beside the road ;).

Offline Macbeth

Re: Great Divide South-North
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2010, 05:27:50 pm »

 Sounds like anywhere in Australia more than 150km from the coast..... You get used to carrying water when you tour in this country.....

 Thanks again for your help everyone.