Author Topic: Aerospoke wheelset VS 36H Wheelset  (Read 11191 times)

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Offline MTB29ERCurt

Aerospoke wheelset VS 36H Wheelset
« on: January 01, 2010, 09:32:26 pm »
I'm a clydesdale mountain bike rider@265 pounds. Whice would be the best wheelset for a cross country trip pulling a bob yak loaded with about 60 to 70 pounds of gear. I know an 36H wheelset would be easier to fix just by replacing a broken spoke on the road. I guess i'm just asking if any clydesdale riders ever toured with aerospoke wheels.

Offline paddleboy17

Re: Aerospoke wheelset VS 36H Wheelset
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2010, 11:55:29 am »
An aero wheelset is designed for one thing: to go fast.  I would think it would be unreliable for a Clydesdale class rider just to go around the block.  Skip the aero or radial laced wheel sets and get a traditional wheel set.
Danno

Offline DaveB

Re: Aerospoke wheelset VS 36H Wheelset
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2010, 09:01:25 am »
An aero wheelset is designed for one thing: to go fast.  I would think it would be unreliable for a Clydesdale class rider just to go around the block.  Skip the aero or radial laced wheel sets and get a traditional wheel set.
Aerospoke wheels are not the low spoke count deep rim wheels typically used for time trials and triathalons that you are picturing.  They are carbon composit wheels molded all in one piece with 5 wide carbon "spokes".  Look here for the details: http://www.aerospoke.com/1/258/index.asp

That said, while they may be quite strong, failure of any kind trashes them.  They are either perfect or useless since they are not field repairable.  Also, I have heard nearly nothing about them, either good or bad, on several mechanics forums so they are not very popular and there may be a fundamental reason for that.  Failure prone?  Weight?  I don't know.

As the OP noted, a 36H, 3X wheel with a moderately deep profile rim would be very strong and still field repairable by any shop.  Aerodynamics and speed are obviously not an issue for a 265 pound rider pulling a BOB.

Offline Macbeth

Re: Aerospoke wheelset VS 36H Wheelset
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2010, 06:35:50 am »

 I have seen a bunch of Aerospoke wheels on bikes that have passed through our shop on customers bikes, mostly fixed gear stuff, and I must say that I do not regard them as a well made product and would definitely recommend you strike them from your list.


Offline randonneur

Re: Aerospoke wheelset VS 36H Wheelset
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2010, 07:53:05 pm »
I have seen a bunch of Aerospoke wheels on bikes that have passed through our shop on customers bikes, mostly fixed gear stuff, and I must say that I do not regard them as a well made product and would definitely recommend you strike them from your list.

I can't disagree more.  Have you ridden an Aerospoke wheel?  An Aerospoke wheel is a very well built composite rim, not the typical injection-moulded plastic rims you see on chinese-built BMX bikes.  Aerospokes are as bulletproof as they come, and the build quality is as good as any other USA-manufactured wheel of equal or lesser price. 

To answer the question asked: yes, Aerospokes are a reasonable alternative to 36-spoke wheels.  Test ride them!

Tradeoffs: weight penalty to avoid spoke truing.  One other drawbacks (pretty standard for any composite wheel): If you do destroy the aluminum rim of the Aerospoke wheel or wear through the brake track, they can't be rebuilt, you must buy a new wheelset (hubs are serviceable).  Durability really is not an issue.  These wheels have been around long enough to prove their design is sound.  If you break an Aerospoke wheel, then it is highly likely that you have serious injuries and won't be riding for a while anyway.  In my experience, with appropriate care, they will hold up to any normal abuse that a rider - even a Clydesdale - would dish out.

Offline Bikearound

Re: Aerospoke wheelset VS 36H Wheelset
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2010, 08:58:46 am »
History has shown that anything is possible if you're will to suffer the consequences. While I doubt anyone will tell you that aerospoke wheels are the way to go, that doesn't mean it wouldn't work for someone who is determined to make them work.

Offline cappie

Re: Aerospoke wheelset VS 36H Wheelset
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2010, 08:50:06 pm »
There is a issue with an Aero Spoke that hasnt been brought yet?   

The 19mm rim width doesn't accomodate wide 30c or wider tires easily with heavy riders. One of our riders experience side wall rim cuts many times while on TransAmerican because of excessive weight on a narrow rim. It would be a no brainer to use for heavy touring if the rim was a 22mm. Honestly - who cares that it is a heavy wheel when used for self-supported touring where reliability is so paramount.

Frankly, 60/70lbs is a quite a lot of gear weight for a simple TransAm. Most riders get by with 40-50lbs.  The same rider had a free wheel hub wear out also - however - one could not have asked for better factory service. The manufacture had a hub replacement waiting for us at a said bicycle shop up the road. The hub is a simple ten minute change out. By the way - this was the second TransAm on the same hub -so - think about it - your bicycle is only as new as the oldest used part on the bike. All-n-all the Aero Spoke is a bullet proof wheel. I have several friends who are prone to wheel isues - the Aero Spoke keeps them on the road riding. 

Offline Macbeth

Re: Aerospoke wheelset VS 36H Wheelset
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2010, 11:32:05 pm »
I have seen a bunch of Aerospoke wheels on bikes that have passed through our shop on customers bikes, mostly fixed gear stuff, and I must say that I do not regard them as a well made product and would definitely recommend you strike them from your list.

I can't disagree more.  Have you ridden an Aerospoke wheel?  An Aerospoke wheel is a very well built composite rim, not the typical injection-moulded plastic rims you see on chinese-built BMX bikes.  Aerospokes are as bulletproof as they come, and the build quality is as good as any other USA-manufactured wheel of equal or lesser price. 

To answer the question asked: yes, Aerospokes are a reasonable alternative to 36-spoke wheels.  Test ride them!

 Sorry, when I said 'well made' what I really meant to say was that I think they have not been designed to be functional, but purely for looks. They weigh 1.6kg (or whatever that is in pounds) which I think is enough to rule them out for most people, especially when you can build a reliable rear wheel (with replaceable spokes, hub and braking surface) at around half that weight. I have built 36 spoke wheels for guys that weigh well over 100kg (220lbs) and they are holding up great......

 They do come in some nice colours though :)

Offline whittierider

Re: Aerospoke wheelset VS 36H Wheelset
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2010, 01:48:38 am »
Quote
I think they have not been designed to be functional, but purely for looks. They weigh 1.6kg (or whatever that is in pounds) which I think is enough to rule them out for most people

1.6kg is about 3.5 pounds.  But for anything but the steepest climbs, more important than wheel weight is wind resistance, and Aerospokes shine there.  Aerospokes have set a lot of world records in track racing where speed and acceleration are everything.  The myth of wheel weight has been soundly disproven.  World Record Holder Marko Baloh (UMCA, 12 hour time trial, 281.32 miles; Fastest 200 miles, 8 hours, 17 min. avg. speed, 24.1 mph) writes, “Aerospoke wheelset is the fastest wheelset I've ever used.  Simply perfect for record attempts that require high speeds."  I don't have any Aerospokes, nor do I have any connection to the company, but I do find them interesting.  If money were no object, I think the only thing that would keep me from using them is the strong crosswinds I often ride in.

I'm not sure there's any justification for them for a big rider with either a trailer or panniers though.  Their aerodynamic advantage would be too insignificant in that situation.

I would check with the manufacturer and see if they have a weight limit; but I know there are tandem Aerospoke wheels, so obviously they know how to do it.

Quote
The 19mm rim width doesn't accomodate wide 30c or wider tires easily with heavy riders. One of our riders experience side wall rim cuts many times while on TransAmerican because of excessive weight on a narrow rim.

A lot of tandem teams are on 23mm tires and they do fine (using 140psi).  It makes for a rather harsh ride though.  I don't know what their rim widths are.  I think 25-28mm is my tire-width preference for our tandem.  We have 32's on it at the moment and I don't like the feel, since there's too much side-to-side flex.