Author Topic: Northern Tier connection from Massachusetts  (Read 2024 times)

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Offline wdolanaca

Northern Tier connection from Massachusetts
« on: June 08, 2010, 09:00:44 pm »
I'm new to the Northern tier route and wondered if anyone has any recommendations on where best to connect to it given that my starting point is Holden, MA (Central MA).

Offline rvklassen

Re: Northern Tier connection from Massachusetts
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2010, 09:39:42 am »
Depends on what you want to do.

One option is to take the Atlantic Coast route (practically in your back yard) north to where they intersect.

Another is to head up to the Adirondack loop - finding your own way there - and then take that to the Northern Tier.

Yet another is to find your way to Albany and follow the Erie Canal (tow path or parallel roads) to Palmyra, where you'll be on the Northern Tier.

Offline jmccue

Re: Northern Tier connection from Massachusetts
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2010, 08:34:26 pm »
Hi wdolanaca

Maybe a little late, but here goes,

Check this out
  http://www.nh.gov/dot/nhbikeped/maps.htm
maybe using the maps you could head directly north.

Another option is you can head west on the Mohawk Trail (Rt 2/2A) to NY then somehow find a way to the "NT Route" once in NY (per rvklassen).   Planning on riding out for that way for a short multi-day trip myself when I find some time.  I have driven it many times :), seems nice, bit narrow in Erving but the traffic there seemed light.  The only problem is around Rt 91, Rt 2 is the same as Rt 91 and you will need to find a alternate route to hook back up with Rt 2.  Mohawk Trail info:
    http://www.mohawktrail.com/

wish you a good trip
regards

Offline Peaks

Re: Northern Tier connection from Massachusetts
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2010, 04:49:20 pm »
heading west from Holden (Central Mass), you need to get over the Berkshire Hills.  Easier said than done.  Route 2 has got some good climb on it, and as I recall, no shoulders in places.  A better route might be to swing through southern Berkshires on Route 9 or 20.  Then, pick up New York State Bike Route #5.