Author Topic: Which pedal?  (Read 15430 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline aggie

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #15 on: July 06, 2010, 03:49:47 pm »
The weight of various shimano pedals per pair: 324 - 523g, 530 - 383g, 540 - 352g, 970 - 325g, 770 - 350g.

Offline sanuk

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2010, 11:13:01 pm »
This conversation has gone way over my head.  I was just comparing two Shimano SPD types - the A530 and M324.  Now we've got several other Shimano types I didn't know exisited along with esoteric stuff like 'eggbeaters!'  No, I checked that site, and 'eggbeaters' are not what I'm looking for.  I'm pretty clear on that at least.  Guess I'm just not at that level of cycling seriousness.  I like to keep things simple.  A choice between A and B will do for now, but thanks anyway.

Offline sanuk

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #17 on: July 08, 2010, 11:16:31 pm »
However, what accounts for the 324 weighing in so much heavier that the 530?  Yeah materials, but does that make it anything other than heavier?

Offline Tourista829

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #18 on: July 14, 2010, 09:26:08 pm »
If you want to get serious, go with the Shimano A530. It is the materials they use. The 324 is a heavier regular pedal with the added weight of spd added to one side. If you are not use to a one sided cleated pedal, then I suggest, you practice, starting from a complete stop, with and without gear. 

Offline pptouring

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #19 on: July 14, 2010, 10:10:09 pm »
Hope I'm not too late to chime in! I'd stay away from SPD pedals, but that is me. I've owned a few pair over the years and really don't care for them; however, some people (very few) love them, but most don't! Take a look at Crank Brothers' pedals and I think you'll be much happier with them. I've used their Egg Beaters for years on my MTB rides and they're great. My wife and I have their inexpensive Candy ones on our touring bikes and they rock! Simple, Light, cheap, easy to clip in/out, and great if your feet get muddy. Our Candies have made two trips to Europe, several trips throughout Florida, daily bike commuting, and you can't beat them. If they failed today, I'd buy another pair tomorrow without hesitation. I wouldn't sweat the weight of your pedals on a touring rig too much. There are other areas where weight is more important and this advice comes from a MTB Racing weight weenie (aka me!).

What's up Bob (aka Tourista829)? Petra and I just returned from touring Czech, Poland, Slovakia, & Hungary. Good times! Hope all is well!

ron

Offline playpiano1980

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2010, 09:26:03 pm »
Have you thought about "CRANK brothers" pedals?  They are the eggbeater type.  They are excellent for clearing mud, which means you can always get your feet in even in the muddiest conditions (no clogging).  They come in a range of pedal sizes.  You can have just the "eggbeater" mechanism  They're brilliant and I wouldn't use anything else now.  I have much experience of pedals having spent many years with both Look and SPD type pedals.  If I was road racing again I wouldn't use them, but for touring, especially off-road, I can highly recommend them.   This is their web-site  www.crankbrothers.com


Totally agree.  I've been using them exclusively (albeit without the platforms) for all my road riding for 7 years.  I like the recessed cleats, and when with a group we had to walk throught mud for awhile, I was the only one to hop back on and ride.  Everyone else had to take off shoes and work the mud out.


Glad someone else agrees with me.  They are definitely the most versatile pedal I have ever used.  I'm suprised no-one else has mentioned them, especially as they are in the USA.  I'm in the UK, but they have a very good name here.

I am in the USA, and a few guys I ride with have these pedals and swear by them. I actually just placed an order on Sunday for them :).
[Unrelated commercial link removed]

Offline tonupgilly

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #21 on: July 28, 2010, 05:53:30 am »
You won't be disappointed.  Enjoy!!

Offline Tourista829

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #22 on: July 28, 2010, 06:43:19 pm »
Hey Ron, How are you and Petra? How was your trip to Europe? If you have pictures. we would love to see them. robertschneck@earthlink.net  We are fine, I took a trip from Tampa to St. Augustine. It was a good 3 day trip. Went up to Inverness via the Withlacoochie Trail, to Ocala, Silver Springs, Salt Springs, Palatka, and onto St. Augustine. Lots of fun. The 4 of us should get together for dinner. Regards, Bob & Dottye

Offline ducnut

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2010, 10:06:07 pm »
This conversation has gone way over my head.  I was just comparing two Shimano SPD types - the A530 and M324.  Now we've got several other Shimano types I didn't know exisited along with esoteric stuff like 'eggbeaters!'  No, I checked that site, and 'eggbeaters' are not what I'm looking for.  I'm pretty clear on that at least.  Guess I'm just not at that level of cycling seriousness.  I like to keep things simple.  A choice between A and B will do for now, but thanks anyway.

I think you misread the first post on Crank Brothers pedals. He mentioned "eggbeater". There is a pedal called that, but, they have a full line that is based off the eggbeater mechanism. Eggbeater is just like SPD, in that it's a style of attachment. Take another look at the Crank Brothers site. Checkout the Acid and Mallet pedals. They are, both, a platform style pedal that allows the use of a cleat, regardless of which side of the pedal is facing up. Try 'em, you'll like 'em.

Offline sanuk

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #24 on: July 30, 2010, 12:33:58 am »
Let's reignite a little controversy on this pedal post.  So I got the cleated combination Shimano pedals, got cleated shoes - Keen comuters and after trying them out and getting the cleats adjusted so they were not too tight and I could supposedly get my feet free when needed, I proptly stall on a fairly steep hill and hit the black stuff and just about fracture my wrist.  Now I'm out of action for a few weeks at least and although the cleats can be adjusted further have zero intention of ever letting this happen again.  I'm not at an age where scars and plaster casts gain any street cred.  So back to where I started on my original, simple flat, non cleated pedals that get scorned by the so-called pros.  Seems now that everyone I talk to has had similar experiences with cleats - some with more serious results even after using them for some time, and many have like me sworn away from them.  So how come no one mentioned that issue when I was enquiring about using them in the first place?  Personally I think all cleated pedals should come with a very clear warning as they are quite evidently very dangerous for the beginer.

Offline whittierider

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #25 on: July 30, 2010, 03:39:07 am »
sanuk, there's probably some danger in just about anything.  When our youngest son was less than ten and I didn't have his feet attached to the pedals at all yet, there were a few times that hitting bad bumps knocked his feet off the pedals, nearly making him crash, at least once in a place where a crash would have been really bad if he had gone off the paved bike trail in the process and down the steep levee of rocks.

I can also say from experience that it's scary when a clipless pedal lets go in a sprint (30mph up a 3% grade in my case) because the release tension won't go high enough and my knee flew up and hit the handlebars.  It happened to me three times.  Fortunately I didn't quite crash; but I now use a Look clone whose maximum release tension is much higher than that of the Look pedals, and I keep it turned all the way up.  I would like even more tension.

Offline tonupgilly

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #26 on: July 30, 2010, 08:02:56 am »
Let's reignite a little controversy on this pedal post.  So I got the cleated combination Shimano pedals, got cleated shoes - Keen comuters and after trying them out and getting the cleats adjusted so they were not too tight and I could supposedly get my feet free when needed, I proptly stall on a fairly steep hill and hit the black stuff and just about fracture my wrist.  Now I'm out of action for a few weeks at least and although the cleats can be adjusted further have zero intention of ever letting this happen again.  I'm not at an age where scars and plaster casts gain any street cred.  So back to where I started on my original, simple flat, non cleated pedals that get scorned by the so-called pros.  Seems now that everyone I talk to has had similar experiences with cleats - some with more serious results even after using them for some time, and many have like me sworn away from them.  So how come no one mentioned that issue when I was enquiring about using them in the first place?  Personally I think all cleated pedals should come with a very clear warning as they are quite evidently very dangerous for the beginer.

That's why I like using the Crank pedals - clipping in is optional if you get the platform type.  I use the Mallets, so starting off uphill is much easier because you don't have to clip in.  Also, I find they release much easier than the SPD type.  Yes - I did use SPD for quite a while when I switched to trail riding on a mountain bike, but took a few tumbles because either I couldn't get my feet out quickly enough, or couldn't clip in when trying to set off on rough, hilly ground.  Simply pushing down on the pedal (SPD) without clipping in was asking for trouble because there was no grip, resulting in feet slipping off the pedal and a raking injury to the shin, in addition to a tumble on rocks or roots.  The Crank platforms give you variable grip depending on how high you set the studs - so your foot can't slip.  If you come to tricky areas, simply unclip and pedal with your feet free - it only involves a small (forward or back) movement of your foot to prevent clipping in again.    I can't recommend them enough - you just have to try them.  Hope you get back on the road soon, but not in direct contact with the black stuff.

Offline gregg

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #27 on: July 30, 2010, 03:41:29 pm »
Sanuk,

I'm very sorry to hear that you crashed with your new clipless pedals, and I hope that you recover quickly. I also wouldn't give up on clipless so soon, but spend some time practicing getting in and out of them in a flat parking lot before you go out again.

The reason that I did not mention that it takes practice to get out of them is that you said, "I'm going to get serious and fit my bike with pedals with cleats before I hit some serious hills this summer." Your question was not if you should go clipless, but that you had already decided to and wanted to know which pedals to get. Because of that I assumed that you knew about the rather steep learning curve involved in making the switch.

Again, I hope that you recover soon from your spill, and don't let it stop you from trying clipless again.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #28 on: July 30, 2010, 07:27:17 pm »
Sorry about your fall Sanuk, but... after you are used to clip-less, forgetting to clip out is kind of like forgetting to breathe.  The key is to get to that point.  I think that getting used to clip-less is helped greatly if the following procedure is followed when setting up new clip-less riders.  I also think this avoids problems caused by poor setup.  I have posted this elsewhere, but figured it was relevant here. So I am posting it again.

This is how I have set up family and friends:

       1. Unless you know they need something special position-wise, set cleats up with all adjustments in the middle of the range.
       2. Have the rider straddle the bike and clip in and out a few times while not moving.
       3. Verify the the initial cleat position is close enough that they feel OK to try it.
       4. Have them ride a few hundred yards and come back.
       5. Remind them to unclip as they are stopping.
       6. Ask them how the cleat adjustment needs to be changed. Discuss as needed and repeat riding if they are unsure.
       7. Make changes to one foot at a time.
       8. Repeat steps 4 -7 as needed increasing the distance ridden in step 4 as they feel they need to. This may take 30 minutes or so before you are done. Repeat again later if needed.

None of the folks I have done this with have had problems either with adjustments or with forgetting to clip out.

Offline ducnut

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #29 on: July 30, 2010, 09:02:32 pm »
Saying that you needed to be warned of the ramifications of clipless pedals is a bit ludicrous. I mean, your shoes are secured to the pedals. If you lose your balance and can't get your feet out, what did you think was going to happen. You should've been able to pick up on that as soon as you clipped in the first time.

I would've never bought SPD pedals to begin with. They are the harshest operating mechanism out there. Just crap, IMHO.

"tonupgilly" is right on the money. It's too bad more shops don't carry them, or are at least be willing to learn about them.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2010, 09:11:05 pm by ducnut »