Author Topic: Getting Starting: Self Contained Touring  (Read 4583 times)

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Offline dancingcyclist

Getting Starting: Self Contained Touring
« on: July 29, 2010, 01:31:26 am »
I'm been thinking of self contained touring and am looking the best way to get started. I was thinking of buying a touring bike and raks, bags and so on, lately I've started thinking about buying a trailer. Money's extra tight, got laid off in June. I currently have two road bikes, both are lightweight with aluminum frames, one does have a triple crank for climbing.
My question is can these be used with a trailer SAFELY, or do I need a heavier built bike? If these bikes can be used, should anything be changed or updated? I was thinking about going to at least 700x25 tires at minimum if they'll clear.
I plan on using my Mountaineering outdoor gear from my climbing days (tent, sleeping bag, stove, etc.) so I don't have any other real expences.

Offline whittierider

Re: Getting Starting: Self Contained Touring
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2010, 03:19:32 am »

Quote
I was thinking of buying a touring bike and raks, bags and so on, [but] lately I've started thinking about buying a trailer.

The trailer might end up being the best bet, since non-touring road bikes don't have any way to mount racks, and the tubing is often too thin to safely handle the clamping forces of the work-arounds.  The manufacturers recommend against such mounting, and they threaten to void your warranty if you clamp anything beyond a cycle-computer sensor or a tail-light mount onto the tubes.

Quote
I currently have two road bikes, both lightweight with aluminum frames, one with a triple crank for climbing.
My question is can these be used with a trailer SAFELY

(comma splices fixed)
The frames should be fine if you use the type of trailer hitch that is clamped by the skewer so you're not smashing frame tubes.  The usual strength deficiency is in the wheels anyway, not the frame.  And yes, you will want the 25mm tires.  Unfortunately a lot of non-touring road bikes won't take anything bigger.  Mine definitely won't.

Quote
Money's extra tight, [as I] got laid off in June.


indyfabz

  • Guest
Re: Getting Starting: Self Contained Touring
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2010, 09:08:56 am »
one does have a triple crank for climbing.

Climbing loaded or unloaded?  You might want to calculate your gear inches.  Whiterider can give you more technical information than I can.

Also agree about the wheels.  Depending on what you have now, you might want to beef up at least the rear wheel.

Offline aggie

Re: Getting Starting: Self Contained Touring
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2010, 10:24:25 am »
I rode across AZ pulling a Bob trailer with my Trek 5200.  The Bob uses a skewer so you don't have to clamp the chain stay.  The only time it seemed "off" was when I stood up while climbing.  Keeping the load in the trailer as light as possible should help that.

Offline TimTyler

Re: Getting Starting: Self Contained Touring
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2010, 12:14:06 pm »
Buying stuff is not the answer, especially since money is tight. You've got a bike and some lightweight outdoor gear, and that's mostly what you need. Maybe you need a rack and a couple of panniers.

I suggest just getting out and trying some overnight trips near home. Find out if you enjoy it, and if you really do, then start upgrading when you can afford it.

http://www.adventurecycling.org/S24O/ Is a great little article describing just how simple overnight tours can be.
Tim

Offline ducnut

Re: Getting Starting: Self Contained Touring
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2010, 05:14:36 pm »
"whittierider" touched on tire suggestions. I took my GF's road bike to the LBS and trial mounted what I was guessing to be the largest that would fit the frame. The width wasn't the issue, but, the height was. So, I ended up with 28mm Continental Touring Plus tires stuffed into a Specialized Dolce.