Author Topic: The Off Season  (Read 2810 times)

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Offline ColoradoKid

The Off Season
« on: August 25, 2010, 07:20:03 pm »
Has anyone considered touring in the off season where it gets cold? How much extra gear and weight should you pack for a Fall/Winter tour?

FredHiltz

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Re: The Off Season
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2010, 07:31:08 pm »
Cannot say until we know the location and the month(s).

Fred

Offline waynemyer

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Re: The Off Season
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2010, 12:01:07 am »
What is this off-season of which you speak?   ;D
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Offline rvklassen

Re: The Off Season
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2010, 08:31:00 am »
There were a couple of guys who rode much of the way from Montreal to DC this year, starting on January 1.   Serious snow as they passed through northern NY and PA.

I think they were on crazyguyonabike.

I don't tour in the winter, but for riding there is no "off season".  I've learned that for every five degree C drop there's one more piece of clothing to add.  So far that's worked to -15.  Haven't tried -20.

Offline cyclocamping

Re: The Off Season
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2010, 10:52:13 am »
Here I just published an article on "Tips to travel by bicycle in cold weather"
www.CycloCamping.com "Gear Up and SAVE on the Best Touring Equipment!
Silver Corporate Partner of Adventure Cycling Association
www.CycloCampingForum.com - www.facebook.com/cyclocamping

Offline johnsondasw

Re: The Off Season
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2010, 04:33:58 pm »
I ride year around in the mountains of Washington State.  I figured out what I needed by doing it, and think that's probably the best way to go.  I don't tour in the winter, but if I did, I think I'd stay in motels!
May the wind be at your back!

Online John Nelson

Re: The Off Season
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2010, 04:58:16 pm »
It's a pretty simple algorithm. Figure out what the expected weather will be, and take the appropriate gear and clothing for that weather. Since everybody reacts to weather differently, you'll need to do some experimentation to determine what you need to ride and sleep at each temperature level. Most of us who ride all year have already figured out what we need to ride at 20 degrees, 30 degrees, 40 degrees, 50 degrees, etc. It also depends on other factors such as wind and sun.

Offline valygrl

Re: The Off Season
« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2010, 01:40:48 am »
I went to the southern hemisphere a couple of times.  I wouldn't consider touring in Colorado in winter.  Possibly in AZ or NM, but the days are so short, it's kind of a drag.

Offline waynemyer

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Re: The Off Season
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2010, 01:00:03 pm »
I ride year around in the mountains of Washington State.  I figured out what I needed by doing it, and think that's probably the best way to go.  I don't tour in the winter, but if I did, I think I'd stay in motels!
This is pretty much how it works.  Because everyone's relative climactic stress is different, there is no substitute for just getting out there and doing it yourself.  I can guarantee that layer setups that work for me won't work for you.  I keep a spreadsheet of what the temperature was, what I wore, how far I rode, and how I felt.  I also note whether the temperature is higher than recent average or lower.  I find that this last part is really important in relation to how I feel.
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Offline MrBent

Re: The Off Season
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2010, 09:12:08 am »
Almost every year, I tour in the desert Southwest in the winter.  A GREAT ride would be to start in Bishop, CA, head south and cut over to Death Valley via the Panamint Valley.  Climb out and head south through Amargossa Valley and continue all the way through the East Mojave Preserve and Joshua Tree National Park to finish in the Palm Springs area.  I've ridden this country and can't recommend it highly enough.  Be prepared for some nights in the low 20's/upper teens F., but days are generally quite pleasant, although it can be windy as hell.  Like the California coast in summer, I recommend a north to south direction because when storms come in, the winds can be extraordinary, and they come roaring in out of the north.  You'll need a good, stout, trustworthy tent, and be prepared for remote camping and long stretches between water/services--like 70 miles in a couple of cases!  Oh, but it's grand, great riding.  This route, Bishop to Palm Spring via the eastern deserts is probably one of the great tours in North America.  In the winter, you'll have a lot of lonely, very quiet roads.  Go do it!!

Here are two journals dealing with this country:

http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/CatrikesontheMojave

http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/4745

Scott