Author Topic: newbie  (Read 4338 times)

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werty

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newbie
« on: August 26, 2010, 12:27:15 am »
hi guys im a newbie in cycling..im planning to buy my first bike..any recommendations for a begginer like me?
 ;D

Offline rvklassen

Re: newbie
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2010, 08:27:57 am »
1. Think about how you want to use it.  Different bikes for different purposes. 

2. Go to a bike shop (not a department store).  You'll wind up paying more, but you won't need to start off by fixing everything that was wrong with it as delivered, and you'll be more likely to ride it.

It will be a compromise between weight and price.  For whatever style of bike you get, you can pay more and it'll be less work to ride.  Don't go overboard on a first bike.

Offline bogiesan

Re: newbie
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2010, 08:37:35 am »
hi guys im a newbie in cycling..im planning to buy my first bike..any recommendations for a begginer like me?
 ;D

Yes. Recumbent.

david boise ID
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline johnsondasw

Re: newbie
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2010, 04:37:02 pm »
Count on spending in the $1000 range to get a decent bike, unless you luck on a used deal.  Don't forget clipless pedals, helmet, and mirror.  Carry a basic bike tool, spare tubes, and a pump or CO2 cartridges.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline John Nelson

Re: newbie
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2010, 04:54:13 pm »
1. Think about how you want to use it.  Different bikes for different purposes. 
2. Go to a bike shop (not a department store).  You'll wind up paying more, but you won't need to start off by fixing everything that was wrong with it as delivered, and you'll be more likely to ride it.

+1

The better you can characterize your intended use, the better the bike shop will do at steering you to the right bike. Don't tell them you want a bike that will do everything. Tell them what you will be doing most often. How far? Type of surface? How hilly? How much gear?

But be aware that the bike shop will attempt to steer you not necessarily to the best bike for your needs, but rather to the closest thing they have to it on the floor. Since you entered this post in an ACA forum, one might guess that you might be interested in touring. Be aware that most bike shops do not stock touring bikes, so they may not steer you that way. Assuming you can wait for them to special order something, ask them to consider not only what they have in stock, but what you can order. Go to several bike shops if you have more than one in the area. If you are primarily interested in touring, ask if the bike they are showing you is designed specifically as a touring bike.

Offline whittierider

Re: newbie
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2010, 06:44:07 pm »
Quote
Don't tell them you want a bike that will do everything.
+1.  There's no such thing as a do-everything bike, but a lot of beginners don't want to believe that, and they end up getting something like a hybrid that's a total compromise and as a result doesn't do anything well.

Offline mcparsons

Re: newbie
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2010, 12:18:02 am »
For starters you should get a bike.  :D

Not a crappy bike or a cheap dept store bike. They will frustrate you and make you not want to ride. But probably not a new $1000 touring rig unless money is no issue for you. You can't know what you want in a bike (or even if you really want to ride) until you have some miles behind you. So unless you can afford it don't over invest in bike #1.  Most likely you will be selling that bike or relegating it to a backup rig.  A used bike can be a good way to start but plan to put another $150 or more into getting it ready to ride. A hybrid is not a good long term solution but they are a cost effective way to learn what you want.

Next, ride that bike. A lot. Learn what gears you use, how  and where you like to ride, what load you like to carry.  In a thousand miles or so you'll know what you want in bike #2.

Finally, save up for bike #2 and be happy.