Author Topic: vermont route 100  (Read 13557 times)

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Offline Clif

vermont route 100
« on: August 06, 2009, 04:59:05 pm »
Does anyone have experience riding Vermont rt 100, from roughly the Killington area going north to Stowe and beyond? This route avoids tough climbs? Traffic? Shoulders? Scenery? Any thoughts are useful. Thanks.

FredHiltz

  • Guest
Re: vermont route 100
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2009, 10:17:34 pm »
Hi Clif. I have ridden all of it at one time or another. Vermont ain't flat, as the saying goes. If it were ironed out, it would be nearly as big as Oregon. You will seldom ride on the flat. Our glacier-carved terrain is easier going north and south, though. The tough climbs are all east-west.

The scenery is beautiful, of course. It is no accident that organized bicycle touring began in Vermont.

Route 100 is all two-lane road, with shoulders varying from none to adequate. Nowhere are they excellent. South of Warren and north of Morrisville, the route is rural and traffic is light enough to rarely be a problem. Between those towns, however, is major tourist country. Streams of cars and trucks in both directions is the rule during summer and again during foliage time--late September to mid-October. The most-visited tourist attraction in the state is on 100 in Waterbury: Ben & Jerry's ice cream factory. (We do not like to admit this, but there it is.)

Some map study will show you parallel roads for much of the busy part. If you and your bike are ready for some well-maintained unpaved roads, so much the better. 52% of Vermont's public highways are unpaved. The Delorme state atlas is good, although it does not distinguish paved and unpaved roads.

Do you have some special destinations in mind on Route 100? If not, I can recommend a much nicer all-paved alternate around the busy part. Get out your state road map and follow along.

100 north to Stockbridge. 107 to Bethel. 12 to Morrisville. Rejoin 100 and continue north. Do not be alarmed by passing through Montpelier. The smallest capital city in the nation, its population is 8,000. It is a rather sleepy place in the summer, when the legislature is not in session.

Fred
« Last Edit: August 08, 2009, 10:20:56 pm by FredHiltz »

Offline Clif

Re: vermont route 100
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2009, 09:05:55 am »
Thanks Fred. That is useful advice. We are actually doing a series of long day trips. Different starting points. Different daily loops....to see some of Vermonts "greatest hits" over the span of 6 days. We will avoid rt 100 in those areas and build trips around a good map and our trusty "Backroad" book, which also seems to avoid rt 100. Looking forward to seeing places like Waitsfield, Stowe and, yes, even Ben and Jerry's, without too much traffic trauma!
Clif   

Offline Peaks

Re: vermont route 100
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2009, 05:51:54 pm »
I've riden Route 100 between Stowe and Killington.  Like most Vermont state routes, I think it's a pretty good road to ride with great scenery.  I'd certainly do it again (and have done it more than once.)

Offline SteveS

Re: vermont route 100
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2009, 08:48:34 pm »
I like route 12 and 12A which runs parallel to 100.  Less traffic, more rural, great views.  Also look into Rte 110 and 14.  All are less famous than ret 100, but i think superior for cycling.

SteveS

Offline christinamurray

Re: vermont route 100
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2009, 05:40:42 pm »
I'm looking to do a century next month between VT friends (Dummerston and Northfield). I'm thinking of riding roughly from Jamaica to Warren via Rt. 100. Thoughts on a good route? Good bicycle maps?

FredHiltz

  • Guest
Re: vermont route 100
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2009, 10:39:42 am »
I'm looking to do a century next month between VT friends (Dummerston and Northfield). I'm thinking of riding roughly from Jamaica to Warren via Rt. 100. Thoughts on a good route? Good bicycle maps?

Hi Christina,

That is one challenging ride. I have ridden all of it, but not in one day. Traffic is not a problem, and the state highway map will do for navigation. Google will find lots of more detailed bike maps and suggested routes with a search for Vermont bike routes.

It's 121 miles with lots of hills, two mountains, and some unpaved parts. The peak at mile 43 is Terrible Mountain between Weston and Ludlow. The one at mile 110 is Roxbury Gap, between East Warren and Roxbury, which entails 4 miles of unpaved road. I suggest taking Plunkton Rd from Rte 100 to East Warren, 5 miles of unpaved road which does not appear on the state highway map, but is easy to find in Google Maps.

An easier century ride--104 miles, less traffic, just as pretty, and all paved--would go from Dummerston:
  Rte 30 to Townshend
  Rte 35 to Chester
  Rte 103 to Gassetts
  Rte 10 part way to N. Springfield
  Rte 106 to Woodstock
  Rte 12 to Northfield

This route has four 800-foot hills, the last at mile 95, but no mountains.

Please let us know how it goes.

Fred

Offline Peaks

Re: vermont route 100
« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2009, 05:20:47 pm »
Fred,

That's almost the reverse of the day 2 of the Green Mountain Club's annual Length of the State Ride that I did last weekend.  We started in Rochester, followed Rt 100 to Killington, then Rt 4 into Woodstock, 106 to Gassetts, 103 to Chester, 35 to Grafton and on to Townsend, and finally Route 30 into Brattleboro. 

Offline JayH

Re: vermont route 100
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2009, 05:42:15 pm »
Not only is there Ben and Jerrys in Waterbury on RT 100, you might consider (if you do indeed take Rt 100) to stop in the Cabot Outlet Store a bit north of Ben and Jerrys... It has free cheese samples!

Jay

FredHiltz

  • Guest
Re: vermont route 100
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2009, 08:37:20 am »
That's almost the reverse of the day 2 of the Green Mountain Club's annual Length of the State Ride that I did last weekend...
Yeah, isn't that a nice route? You had great weather. I did that train/bike trip in the 90s, almost the same route, and recall it fondly.

Fred

Offline clay

Re: vermont route 100
« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2010, 04:59:25 pm »
One of my favorite rides... I have done this in sections with a few select "cozy" overnights in choice locations. My favorite section was a stay at the Lareau Farm Inn in Waitsfield, VT...which got us into the American Flatbread Restaurant without a wait (amazing pizza)...They have a great breakfast in the morning at the Inn but there is also a fabulous bookstore and cafe in Rochester, VT that is nice for a cup of coffee and an interesting book. Heading south this is mostly downhill and goes through a really nice section of State Forest.  Neat wooden bowl Mill in Granville and glass blowing shop next door.