Author Topic: Fenders for touring  (Read 13549 times)

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Offline driftlessregion

Re: Fenders for touring
« Reply #15 on: December 27, 2010, 11:01:54 pm »
The Planet Bike fenders above are too short to do anything but keep the stripe off your back. The ideal fender is lonnnggg, and wider than your tires so that it keeps not only your back clean but your bottom bracket and feet too. Some folks add a mud flap. Even my Planet Bike fenders that have the flap aren't really long enough but are a good start. French bike builders of many years ago used aluminum fenders and prided themselves in how they were mounted: the curve of the fender carefully following the curve of the wheel with equal space between tire and fender all the way around. See photos in the current Bicycle Quarterly http://www.bikequarterly.com/currentissue.html.

Offline rvklassen

Re: Fenders for touring
« Reply #16 on: December 29, 2010, 05:03:32 pm »
This "tip" should apply to all makes of fenders.  One potential hazard with any front fender is the possibility of a rock, stick, etc. getting picked up by the front wheel and jammed between the fender and tire.  This can stop the front wheel almost immediately with obvious results.

As a safety feature, I've replaced the M5x.8 metal bolts that fasten the fender struts to the front dropout eyelets with nylon bolts.  In the event of a jam, these bolts will break and let the fender move out of the way.  They are plenty strong enough for normal service.

One of the features of SKS fenders is that the attachment is break-away.  The struts attach to plastic parts that bolt to the eyelets.  The connection between the plastic part and the strut is such that they can detach (with some effort) without damage. 

If possible, mount the fender so that the edge where the tire enters (the bottom/back) is closer to the tire than the other end.  That way things can't gradually get themselves wedged.

Offline PeteJack

Re: Fenders for touring
« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2011, 11:25:58 am »
Quote
As a safety feature, I've replaced the M5x.8 metal bolts that fasten the fender struts to the front dropout eyelets with nylon bolts.  In the event of a jam, these bolts will break and let the fender move out of the way.  They are plenty strong enough for normal service.

I wouldn't count on a Nylon bolt breaking away. You don't want to find out how strong they are when you are hurtling over the bars.Try breaking a cheap electrical tie. I would recommend SKS fenders, the breakaway device really does work. And the PB "mudflap" is a complete waste of time. As you will know if you have ever followed someone with PB fenders in the wet. Unless you plan to never have anyone riding behind you a flap that comes to within 3-4" of the ground is a must.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Fenders for touring
« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2011, 02:14:46 pm »
I would recommend SKS fenders, the breakaway device really does work. And the PB "mudflap" is a complete waste of time. As you will know if you have ever followed someone with PB fenders in the wet. Unless you plan to never have anyone riding behind you a flap that comes to within 3-4" of the ground is a must.

Note 1: The SKS "breakaway" device is really a pop-out device; pop the struts back in, once you've cleared the wheel, and ride away.  Nothing to replace.

Note 2: Make your own mudflap!  Go to Sears and get a pop rivet kit if you don't already have one (it counts towards "he who dies with the most toys").  Drill a couple holes in the fender, preferably with the wheel out.  Cut a plastic bottle, or some other worthy stock, to make the mudflap, and rivet it on.  My cheap shampoo bottle has lasted ten years so far, although you can get a Brooks leather flap if that looks too chintzy.  (I prefer to think of it as an anti-theft addition to my preciousss.)  Roofing felt also has been suggested, but I don't have any experience with that.

Note 3: Even if you're not worried about people following you, a mud flap is worthwhile on your front fender to keep the schmuck off your drive train.

Offline PeteJack

Re: Fenders for touring
« Reply #19 on: January 05, 2011, 07:13:10 pm »
Pop-out vs breakaway is a distinction without a difference as far as I can see. OK OK nothing actually breaks.

And PLEASE be aware there is nothing gradual about what happens when you get a small branch between your wheel and fender. The first time it happened to me it destroyed the cheap front fender in the blink of an eye. If the fender had been stronger the resultant jam would have had me over the bars. The second time the struts in the SKS breakaway device popped out. I stopped and popped them back in without getting off the bike. I don't think there's much likelihood of the fender struts going in the wheel, when they pop out the struts spring outwards i.e. away from the wheel. Just don't ride any more than you have to with them out.

Living in the Northwest we may get more tree litter on the roads than other parts of the country. It's surprising how big a piece of tree can ride up into your fender. Of course the thing to do is to avoid said pieces but after a windstorm that can be almost impossible, especially on trails where there's no auto traffic to purge the debris to the side of the road.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 07:30:09 pm by PeteJack »

Offline ducnut

Re: Fenders for touring
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2011, 07:54:20 pm »
Just a note on the SKS fenders. The black are truly chocolate brown with black stripes. They don't look too bad on my blk/gray bike, but, I'd rather they accurately describe the color of their product. And, I added flaps to both fenders. My GF appreciates the usefulness of my setup, as she no longer gets stuff thrown into her face as she did before, while following me.

Not a great pic, but, one can see the colors.

Offline litespeed

Re: Fenders for touring
« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2011, 09:56:35 pm »
After reading this blog I decided to finally get fenders for my Litespeed Blue Ridge. I got the SKS P45's and installed them with some fudging and twiddling. I had to straighten out the front clamp on the rear fender to give it more grab on the crosspiece. Also I had to trim the front fender stays 1" and pull out the rear of the rear fender a bit to give it more clearance. The fenders have little clearance, especially under/against the rear rack. If my tires pick up more than 1/4" of mud I will have to do something about it. The 35mm Schwalbe Marathon Supremes are about the biggest tires I can now use. The old Continental 37's I used to run wouldn't do. The fenders look right handsome and are very nicely made and designed.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2011, 10:01:19 pm by litespeed »

Offline PeteJack

Re: Fenders for touring
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2011, 10:58:33 pm »
My vote is for SKS. The 'breakaway' device really works and could save you from flying over the bars. Beware of assumptions about only small stuff getting jammed in there. Your wheel can be locked up in the blink of an eye.

I recommend a long flap on your rear fender. Also a flap on the front fender keeps a lot of crud off you and your chain.

Long flaps on rear fenders are known as Buddy Flaps for a reason. They keep your buddy following you in the rain from getting soaked by your rooster tail. Experience tells me that in this respect the flap on PB fenders is worthless.