Author Topic: camera choice  (Read 8053 times)

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Offline lonerider

camera choice
« on: December 29, 2010, 03:17:46 pm »
Long time tourist, now doing day trips only. My Pentax MX film camera is still fine, but want to go digital to rid my self of the expense of buying and processing film. What camera will shoot like a simple 35mm film slr? Don't want tons of functions, just functionality that has super simple controls and good picture quality. So far I have found nothing as simple as my film camera that takes quality photos. Suggestions requested. Thanks.

FredHiltz

  • Guest
Re: camera choice
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2010, 07:04:11 pm »
First question: do you want/need interchangeable lenses? Reading here, I get the impression that the full SLR kit is bulky and heavy enough to stay in the pannier most of the time. Maybe a quality point-and-shoot with the typical zoom 28mm - 135mm would be the best camera because it would be used. Tell us more about what type of shooting you plan, your budget, and what features are important to you. For example, is photography secondary to biking or the other way around? Then the opinions will flow.

BTW, my film camera was Pentax SLR. Now it's Canon's S90, since superseded by the S95, which fits in a shirt pocket, has full manual control when needed, and excellent IQ.

Fred

Offline lonerider

Re: camera choice
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2010, 07:53:39 pm »
Interchangable lens is not needed, but a quality image is. Digital zoom is not as good as an actual zoom lens so I desire the lens to be zoom. When I ride I stop infrequently, but will stop if a particuar scene grabs my fancy that reflects the general experience of the ride that day. Mostly scenic settings while riding, but almost all people pics when not. My daughter is in plays so I need something that can shoot quickly and resets for the next picture quickly. My son is into robotics competitions and I need something with a good zoom. The problem with dslr is the size is way too big. The size of my Pentax MX would be acceptable, but from what I have seen is the dslr is about the size of the old Nikon F2 cameras. Just too big. I have looked at the new Sony camera with a small body and zoom lens, but too pricey. If Pentax made a small dslr I would consider it.

Offline aRoudy1

Re: camera choice
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2010, 01:50:13 am »
You might check out the fuji S1800--18X optical zoom, adjustable flash, 12 Mega pixel. 

Offline sprocketman

Re: camera choice
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2010, 01:58:37 am »
Do not buy an Olympus. My Olympus WP 550 has been in the shop more than in my hand. Also, it is a waterproof camera, but it is not waterproof!  I did a 1500 mile trip last July. I took a digital and a film camera. Digital is cool when it works. I have a twin lense reflex 120 film camera (Yashica) built in 1954. I still use it. It works. It has no batteries. Film is a great backup.

Offline bogiesan

Re: camera choice
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2010, 08:40:25 am »
Long time tourist, now doing day trips only. My Pentax MX film camera is still fine, but want to go digital to rid my self of the expense of buying and processing film. What camera will shoot like a simple 35mm film slr? Don't want tons of functions, just functionality that has super simple controls and good picture quality. So far I have found nothing as simple as my film camera that takes quality photos. Suggestions requested. Thanks.

1. Cost of processing is often offset by the time and disk space required to store, cuyll, tweak, print, or email digital images. You'll see that where you once shot two rols of 36-exp film, you will shoot 500 digitals.
2. There are mroe than 100 simple digital SLRs and another 50 or so truly complex DSLRs. I doubt you will find one that will accept your Pentax lenses so you're starting from scratch. Personally, I'd never think of traveling with my DSLRs unless I was being paid; too heavy, too much money tied up.
3. Functionality? You mean independent aperture and shutter speed adjustment and over-ridable automatic metering as well as manual focusing? Not on simple digital cameras. You step through menus to make changes in the control systems.
4. Picture quality is a weird topic. I maintain that 95% of your biking images will be emailed as very tiny jpg. The few shots you print larger than 6x4 probably are not worth the super-sized sensors being marketed these days. A 12mp camera shoots an image that is four orders of magnitude larger than you need.
5. People tend to buy huge storage cards that will hold thousands of images; they never change film, so to speak. If they lose the camera, everything's gone. Suggest you consider smaller cards or a digital downloader.
6. Remember you will want a good protective case and a wrist strap.
7. Don't buy a bike camera you can't afford to lose or have destroyed.

david boise ID
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: camera choice
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2010, 02:49:51 pm »
Do not buy an Olympus. My Olympus WP 550 has been in the shop more than in my hand. Also, it is a waterproof camera, but it is not waterproof!

Interesting.  I took an Olympus point and shoot (that I got for staying with the same company so many years) cross-country in 2009.  It wasn't waterproof, but I had no problems with it.  My daughter had bought a water- and shock-resistant Olympus (so we shared a battery charger), and she tested with both dropping and sopping.  No problems.

What did you do to make the camera gods mad?

Offline staehpj1

Re: camera choice
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2010, 05:52:04 pm »
Do not buy an Olympus. My Olympus WP 550 has been in the shop more than in my hand.
Every brand has a bad model or individual lemon once in a while.  Olympus is a well thought of brand.  I know of or have owned Nikons or Canons that croaked prematurely and other's that went through hell and back for many years.  I don't think I'll boycott a brand because one person had problems with one camera.

Offline lonerider

Re: camera choice
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2010, 06:53:35 pm »
Bogiesan, thanks for the info. Seems you have a good bit of knowledge in this subject. I will keep looking for the right unit to make life easier. Simplicity does not seem to go hand in hand with digital camera with quality pics. I do love film, especially b&w, but the offerings are internet only for film, and internet only for processing. Do my business locally to support my community an am willing to change formats to avoid doing business on line.
I do not listen to people who grump about stuff they had problems with unless there are 3 or more with the same issue.

Offline sprocketman

Re: camera choice
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2010, 03:08:45 am »
PDLAMB,

My Olympus 550 WP was in two feet of water for thirty seconds when the housing leaked. It was under warranty and Olympus made me pay to ship it back. When I got the camera back and put the battery in, the camera would not shut off. Back it went again. Now I have the camera back, my battery power meter goes from full charge to empty in about two minutes. I have given up on shipping this camera back to Olympus and trying to fix a camera that is less than a year old. The warranty is now over.

Offline lonerider

Re: camera choice
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2010, 07:57:31 am »
Did you replace the camera?

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: camera choice
« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2010, 09:11:41 am »
My Olympus 550 WP was in two feet of water for thirty seconds when the housing leaked. It was under warranty and Olympus made me pay to ship it back. When I got the camera back and put the battery in, the camera would not shut off. Back it went again. Now I have the camera back, my battery power meter goes from full charge to empty in about two minutes. I have given up on shipping this camera back to Olympus and trying to fix a camera that is less than a year old. The warranty is now over.

Thanks for the additional detail.  I don't doubt you had a bad experience with your camera or the repair service.  However, since your experience differs so greatly from my (our) own, I felt I needed to point out that your bad experience is not universal.

My daughter bought her Olympus shock/water resistant camera to take kayaking, and I'm sure it was submerged more than once.  She reported banging it up pretty good.  On our ride, I saw her drop it 3 ft. onto tarmac, and use it in the rain; It continued to work.  Of course, since neither her camera nor my own has ever required service, I can't comment on their repair service.

Who knows which is more typical?

Offline FeetFirstFella

Re: camera choice
« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2011, 09:56:52 pm »
Lonerider, one of the newer 'credit card' size digital cameras similar to the Canon Elph series are as simpistic as you can get when in full auto mode and are compact enough to carry anywhere.  Mine slips easily into my jersey pocket, and with a lanyard around my neck I can shoot on the fly on the bike if I need to or off the bike it's always on me.  The best camera to take is the camera you'll use, and to use it you must have it on you, not buried in a bag somewhere.  Sometimes those quick shots are some of the best.

Offline Macbeth

Re: camera choice
« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2011, 12:56:56 am »
I have a Canon Ixus 130 IS that I carry with me everywhere.... Picture quality is awesome, very easy to use and a great size. I take a LOT of pics whilst rolling and they always come out just as I remember seeing the valley/mountains/girl I was looking at.... The nice thing with Canon too, as I understand it, is that you are not restricted to using their proprietry batteries etc, and it should be easy to find accessories in most places....

 http://www.canon.com.au/en-au/For-You/Digital-Cameras/IXUS-Digital-Cameras/130IS-Camera

 Very highly recommend this camera

Adam

Offline lonerider

Re: camera choice
« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2011, 06:28:41 am »
Amazing what one can learn in a few days on the internet. I have not owned an automatic camera in the past and was looking for something fully manual again thinking that digital units would be smaller. No so, but nor is manual control. Guess digital means electronic control throughout the camera and manual is simply a menu driven thing. No dials or buttons like my old Pentax SLR which means taking the eye from the view finder (if it has one) and surfing the menu. Different and potential PIA, but it is what it is. Guess I must adapt. This electronic world seems so complicated.

The obvious is what Macbeth suggested: Point and shoot auto. The Cannon looks good. Seems they are all much the same so I will go with the big guy, Cannon.

By the way Macbeth, is one to assume you have a leaning toward Shakespeare?