Author Topic: Gear  (Read 6709 times)

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Offline eschlers

Gear
« on: February 03, 2011, 09:04:20 pm »
I want to buy a a tent and sleeping bag, but want to use it for both biking and hiking. Would I be better off buying backpacking equipment, or biking equipment. I have checked both out and the specs are pretty close on both, but the price for biking stuff is alot higher.
thanks!

Online John Nelson

Re: Gear
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2011, 10:10:02 pm »
Except for a few odd-ball creations, there is no such thing as "biking equipment" when it comes to tents and sleeping bags. Whatever would fit your backpacking needs will certainly fit your cyclotouring needs, assuming temperature ranges will be similar. Cyclotourists sometimes place a bit higher value on free-standing tents than a backpacker would because of the frequency of setting up tents in urban settings when cyclotouring.

I am a bit curious, however, in specifically what you found as "biking equipment" that costs so much more.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Gear
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2011, 07:02:57 am »
Backpacking stuff is the way to go.  The bike specific tents I have seen were all pretty poor designs in my opinion.  I have never heard of a bike specific sleeping bag and can't imagine any reason for one.

Offline paddleboy17

Re: Gear
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2011, 01:16:20 pm »
I too thought that gear was pretty generic.  I might encourage you to avoid the lightweight versions of tents that are sometimes offered.  Ultra thin tent foot prints and the like just do not hold up.

I tour but I have done some backpacking as well.  I took a backpacking class to prepare for touring, and I think backpacking classes are an excellent pimer for touring. 

I think that touring is harder on your metabolism, so I think that you need to eat better.  Touring often has the luxury of being able to resupply more often.  So what you eat and how you cook it could be different for touring.  I personally do not take freeze dried meals on tour, and I try to cook fancier than food that boils.

All of my other gear could be used for backpacking.
Danno

Offline eschlers

Re: Gear
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2011, 04:25:23 pm »
Thanks for all the input!
I started by looking in the ACA's store. The prices they had for tents and sleeping bags were a little out of my range. I went to the Cabela's website and found almost the same equipment for a lesser price.

I intend to start touring in small increments this year along with more backpacking.

Online John Nelson

Re: Gear
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2011, 04:29:56 pm »
None of the tents and bags that ACA sells is cycling specific. Everything you find there can be found in camping stores as well.

Offline eschlers

Re: Gear
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2011, 04:54:04 pm »
Hi John,
 I just assumed that the gear ACA sells would be more for biking and touring instead of backpacking.

Offline DaveB

Re: Gear
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2011, 09:21:03 pm »
Check out Campmor's web site also (www.campmor.com).  They have a large selection of name brand tents, sleeping bags and other backpacking items well suited to bicycle touring and their prices are very good.   REI is another good source for gear but I've never found their pricing particularly attractive.

Offline valygrl

Re: Gear
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2011, 09:30:48 pm »
You can often get good prices at www.rei-outlet.com.

Offline ezdoesit

Re: Gear
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2011, 02:55:36 pm »
 ;)
+1 for REI ;D
Remember it's mind over matter
you don't mind it doesn't matter

Ride more Drive Less

Offline Tourista829

Re: Gear
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2011, 04:35:37 pm »
I like a balance of comfort 1st and weight 2nd. I go one size up on a tent, (Sierra Designs) like a little more comfort on my on my sleeping pad. (Therm A Rest) Sleeping bag depends on when you camp and temperatures encounted. (Marmot)

Offline eschlers

Re: Gear
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2011, 10:28:14 pm »
I had planned on a 2 man tent, for room. The bag I figured 20 degrees. I doubt I'll be riding or camping in anything close to that. The pad, I hadn't ever considered.
I'll check into the makers you mentioned.

Offline Tourista829

Re: Gear
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2011, 12:44:07 pm »
The Tent, I like Sierra Designs because of its longevity, they make a bike specific design, (Clip Flashlight under 4 lbs) & as a company, are reputable. If traveling with others, I would look at Big Agnes.(you can share weight with others) They offer an optional vestibule, I like to stow my gear near me & the added privacy is nice. One can never have enough vestibule space.
Footprint matching the bottom of your tent             
Matress Pad* 1 1/2" in depth, 2" is better. Check the shape & length 4 your body. ThermaRest              Sleeping Bags, I like Marmot because it is very light, packs small (fits in my pannier), & is comfortable. Liner Although I have not done this, I hear you could go with a lighter bag and use a liner, when you occasionally camp in colder weather. (Like when you are in the Rockies, at altitude) *In a Monsoon, when the floor was soaked, my matress pad kept my sleeping bag dry. My gear was in my waterproof Ortlieb Panniers, and my rain fly kept the rain off me.

Offline eschlers

Re: Gear
« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2011, 02:22:59 pm »
Thanks Tourista, I'll check them out.
Do you have dealers near you or did you order online? If so, did you have any issues with stuff ordered online? I like to be able to go and look at stuff myself. I always seem to have problems with buying stuff sight unseen.

Offline Tourista829

Re: Gear
« Reply #14 on: February 08, 2011, 12:34:30 am »
Eschlers, I live in Tampa, Florida and most of my gear we had to get either on line, stores outside the area, or sight unseen. Our Touring Bikes a Comotion Norwest Tour and a Thorn Audax MK3 were purchased sight unseen. We were fortunate to have two very good bicycle shops, who knew what they were doing. Our Tents, we were able to go to Camp Mor, in Paramus, N.J. to see the Sierra Designs. Seeing tents set up and making sure you have enough room for you and another person, and gear is very important. Other keys are ventilation, ease of set up, sit up height, weight, packing size, and durability are mission specific. REI in Greensboro, N.C. for the sleeping pad. (I actually laid on several, and glad I did) I like a small pillow and a chair that if you put your sleeping pad in it, doubles as a chair. However, Dicks Sporting Goods has a good selection of sleeping bags (Marmont) and sleeping pads. The main thing, like the bicycles, get your fit, comfort, and mission figured out. Most things are a compromise, but not on things that are most important to you. If you purchase online, make sure they have a good return policy and if possible, reimburse you for return shipping.