Author Topic: Oversized touring frames?  (Read 11035 times)

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Offline jeff s

Oversized touring frames?
« on: February 04, 2011, 03:54:02 pm »
Anyone know of a maker of a 64cm-66cm (production) touring frame? I can't afford a custom build, and my 62cm B'stone RBT is really a bit small for me.  I haven't been able to Google anything up...

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2011, 05:46:53 pm »
Fuji advertises its touring bike in an XL as a 64 cm bike.  It's now a compact style frame, so it's not directly comparable to my older 62.

Every maker does things a little differently, which is why I recommend trying before you buy unless you're going custom.  You may be able to get a bigger stem (either Nitto or custom Bruce Gordon) to increase your comfort on your current bike.

Offline DaveB

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2011, 09:16:52 pm »
Custom steel frames usually aren't that tremendously expensive unless you go to a very famous maker so you might be surprised how afforable one is.  I guess it depends on how tight your budget really is.

One maket I know about is Co-Motion and they will build a custom variation of their single bikes for a $300 upcharge.  Their Nor'Wester Tour is one of their major touring frames and that frameset sells for $1700 so a custom would be ~$2000 for the frame and fork.   

Fuji does indeed list their largest (XL) Touring bike as a 64cm and the MSRP is $1050 with decent if not elegant components so that is also a possible choice.  Here is their web site's geometry chart for the touring bike. http://www.fujibikes.com/bike/details/touring


Offline jeff s

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2011, 12:21:55 pm »
Thanks, pd & Dave.  I've got the longest Nitto stem, which helped considerably.  I'll take a look at/ride on the Fuji, and give Co-Motion's website a look.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2011, 10:13:45 am »
I checked this weekend, and my (replacement, "new") Fuji tour frame from 2008 is a 64 cm.  It fits a 34" inseam, which may be small for your needs.

Let me recommend a different tack; look at Gunnar bikes' Grand Tour frame.  $975 "stock" for the frame, and you can customize it as you want.  Gunnar's normally available sizes go up to 68 cm.   I say "stock" in quotes, because this is Waterford's budget line, and all their frames are made to order.  This will probably double your cost compared to a pre-built frame, because you'll have to pay list for all the components.  Your other option would be to find a used frame or bike -- inspect the frame very carefully before you put your money down!

Offline waynemyer

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Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2011, 06:51:55 pm »
Rodriguez? Custom-ish without the corollary price tag.
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Offline lonerider

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2011, 05:01:35 am »
Why not build your own frame? Easy to do and very satisfying.

Offline jeff s

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2011, 12:32:06 pm »
thanx for the leads on Gunnar & Rodriguez frames - I'll check into it! There are week-long UBI classes here in Portland where you can learn framebuilding, and build your own frame - I think it would be great but can't quite dedicate the time/expense at present. 

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2011, 06:55:36 am »
Tip: It's all about tube angles, size, fit, structural integrity, and materials, e.g., chromoly, carbon fiber, etc.
It's possible to pick up a good used frame for next to nothing, outfit it for a couple of hundred dollars, possibly less, and tour cross country in the USA with no problems whatsoever.

A cheap 10 by 12 poly tarp for $15.00 is as functional and even more versatile than a $400.00 tent in some places.
Cheapo back packs from Goodwill with a good grade of plastic trash can liner inside will keep your gear completely dry even if left out in a torrential downpour all night long.

It isn't necessary to spend all that much to do a transcontinental bicycle tour.

Offline DaveB

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2011, 08:52:25 am »
Tip: It's all about tube angles, size, fit, structural integrity, and materials, e.g., chromoly, carbon fiber, etc.
It's possible to pick up a good used frame for next to nothing, outfit it for a couple of hundred dollars, possibly less, and tour cross country in the USA with no problems whatsoever.

A cheap 10 by 12 poly tarp for $15.00 is as functional and even more versatile than a $400.00 tent in some places.
Cheapo back packs from Goodwill with a good grade of plastic trash can liner inside will keep your gear completely dry even if left out in a torrential downpour all night long.

It isn't necessary to spend all that much to do a transcontinental bicycle tour.

This is all good advice but not at all germain to the OP's question.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2011, 10:24:51 am »
It's possible to pick up a good used frame for next to nothing, outfit it for a couple of hundred dollars, possibly less, and tour cross country in the USA with no problems whatsoever.

It isn't necessary to spend all that much to do a transcontinental bicycle tour.

I don't disagree that it's possible.  I think it may be reasonable to pay a bit more for reliability.  Although having a warranty doesn't guarantee you won't have any problems, there's an expectation (hopefully with a company behind the warranty to meet that expectation) that a new bike is not going to fail.  Building a garage queen up on the cheap isn't for bicycle mechanic novices.  It may be a great way to apprentice your way into a mechanic's knowledge, but fixing things on tour isn't much fun.

As I understand this thread, it's not focused on cost to the exclusion of everything else.  Did I miss something?

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2011, 12:15:30 pm »
Americans love using superlatives, especially where they do not actually apply.

Not "at all" germain? You mean my reply had absolutely nothing to do with bicycle frames? Do you mean the OP said nothing whatsoever to do with affordability?

If you  cannot get a frame and bolt on wheels, brakes, levers, and run cables , and put in a spindle and chain rings, you've got problems. There are plenty of books that tell how. It's easy. There's almost nothing to it. I have used used frames, very old ones on extremely long tours over all sorts of road conditions since 1985, and that was two different frames both old and used. 37,000 miles through 19 countries except for a shorter tour in China for which I used a new off-road sort of bike. Any well made frame will do as long as it is not defective, even if it is twenty years old. There are plenty of perfectly good used frames out there if you know where to find them. However, you might not get one on demand. You might have to do some searching around to get a good one at fleamarkets, bike shops, Goodwill stores, thrift shops, and garage sales. If you get one from a dealer, it's yours when you hand over the cash and when you want it.

The idea that one must spend $1200.00 or more on a bike, hundreds on a tent, hundreds on panniers, and hundreds on maps is absolute hogwash. You can do exactly what people do with thousands of dollars worth of equipment for a small fraction of what they spend to do it. I've been doing it for years.

« Last Edit: February 15, 2011, 12:47:59 pm by Westinghouse »

Offline DaveB

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #12 on: February 16, 2011, 08:47:05 am »
Not "at all" germain? You mean my reply had absolutely nothing to do with bicycle frames? Do you mean the OP said nothing whatsoever to do with affordability?
If you will reread the OP the question it  only asks about getting a large enough off-the-shelf frame and said he didn't think he could afford to have it custom made.  That's all he asked.

He said nothing about trying to minimize all other costs or find make-do ways to build his bike or get camping gear.  Your advice was and is all correct but my point was that it drifted way off the original topic.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #13 on: February 16, 2011, 01:48:03 pm »
Good point. However, maybe, just maybe some person with a very limited budget might come along and read here and think that with all these high dollar items being mentioned, there is no way he or she could ever do a Xcountry tour. I like to point out that it can be done for only a small fraction of the outlay for gear that many people spend.
Kind of like getting a beer somewhere. You can go into a high end hotel and pay $10.00 for a draft beer, and you can get the same thing around the corner from there for $1.50. It's the same kind of beer and produces the same result. But one guy pays 7 times what the other pays.

I'm just telling him / her that it is not necessary to pay out like that for a perfectly good ride.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2011, 01:34:57 pm by Westinghouse »

Offline DaveB

Re: Oversized touring frames?
« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2011, 09:42:48 am »
I'm just telling him / her that it is not necessary to pay out like that for a perfectly good ride.
No disagreement with there.