Author Topic: safety on a tour bike ride  (Read 5512 times)

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Offline myangels

safety on a tour bike ride
« on: March 27, 2011, 10:48:55 am »
Hi,

I am not new to biking, but am new to touring on a bike. I have been an avid rider for about 5 years now and have mostly done trail riding. Next year i am planning on doing a bike tour for a fundraiser across 3 to 4 states. I think I may have a few people riding with me.

I have never done an overnight trip on a bike and plan to do a few this summer to get me ready for my tour. My question is, what type of safety precautions do you put in place for a tour ride if you are only going with a few people? I know my husband, who does not ride, will ask this question first. Or, do you not put any precautions in place for a tour ride?

Thanks!

Offline mucknort

Re: safety on a tour bike ride
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2011, 12:22:36 pm »
Items to be seen: Flag, Triangle, Hi-Vis shirt/jacket, flashing front/rear light.
Items for protection from dogs: small air horn, Halt dog spray.
Items to help make riding safer: mirror(s), enroll in League of American Bicyclists Bike Safety Class.
Items for communication: cell phone, walkie-talkie (if group members don't ride together), ipad/netbook for email and skype to folks back home, Spot device reports your location through GPS and notifies friends/family/911 in emergency.
Items for self sufficiency: Take basic bicycle maintenance class,read bicycle repair books/internet articles, take 1st Aid class.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2011, 10:28:49 pm by mucknort »

Offline John Nelson

Re: safety on a tour bike ride
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2011, 02:17:06 pm »
It's hard to know what your and your husband's concerns are, but maybe this will help:

http://www.adventurecycling.org/resources/momworry.pdf

Probably the biggest danger is the risk of a bike accident. If you've been riding for a while, you have probably already developed the skills to ride safely. Big cities are likely the most dangerous places to ride. Most bike tours, however, avoid big cities like the plague. On the country roads most of us favor, cars are few enough to not bother you much, but not so rare that you won't be able to find help if you need it.

Most people worry about two things: getting hit by a car and encountering a crazed psychopath. Both of these risk combined are no more likely than the risk you take each day when you drive your car to work or to the grocery store.

Offline Awf Hand

Re: safety on a tour bike ride
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2011, 03:08:10 pm »
I made an emergency contact card that I carried on my high-vis jersey like a luggage tag.  I also programmed ICE (In Case of Emergency) on my cell phone.
Have a clear plan so somebody knows where you are or expect to be each evening.
Make photocopies of the cards in your wallet/pack in case they are lost/stolen.  It's easier to call somebody to cancel, if you know what you had.

-The American Red Cross sells DANDY first aid kits for WAY cheaper than a sports store of even WalMart.  For a group of riders, someone will get a boo-boo, sunburn, sliver, or have a headache or sore joint.

Offline myangels

Re: safety on a tour bike ride
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2011, 05:51:11 pm »
Those are all terrific idea's, thanks!

John, something like you posted is exactly what my husband will say when i approach the idea to him, i'm going to print that off.

Offline paddleboy17

Re: safety on a tour bike ride
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2011, 12:06:02 pm »
On a ride last summer, we got hastled one night at a state campground by some drunks.  I tried calling the ranger office as this seemed unworthy of the police, but the phone rang and rang and I never got the ranger.  The drunks talked a good game but never actually did anything.

Later I actually had a chance to talk to a ranger and what he told me was to always call 911.  The 911 dispatcher would have contacted the responsible security force, in this case the park ranger.  Due to budget cut backs, at night one ranger is responsible for more than one park.  The 911 dispather would be able to get a hold of the ranger, whereas I would not be able to get a hold of night ranger.

So carry a cell phone, and don't be afraid to call 911.
Danno

Offline rvklassen

Re: safety on a tour bike ride
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2011, 01:33:50 pm »
My question is, what type of safety precautions do you put in place for a tour ride if you are only going with a few people?
First reply:
Items to be seen: Flag, Triangle, Hi-Vis shirt/jacket, flashing front/rear light.
Items for protection from dogs: small air horn, Halt dog spray.
Items to help make riding safer: mirror(s), enroll in League of American Bicyclists Bike Safety Class.
Items for communication: cell phone, walkie-talkie (if group members don't ride together), ipad/netbook for email and skype to folks back home, Spot device reports your location through GPS and notifies friends/family/911 in emergency.
Items for self sufficiency: Take basic bicycle maintenance class,read bicycle repair books/internet articles, take 1st Aid class.
How about none of the above?

Well, not quite. 

We usually wear fluorescent jerseys, but we also have less brilliant ones, and on tour we need to alternate.  For lights, we have a rear light, which only goes on when it is dull/rainy/dusk. 

And a front light which goes on even less of the time - generally only dusk.

Cell phone - pay as you go.  And charger; check.  Email can happen at libraries.

Bike tools - yes, but I don't think of that as a safety thing. 

Offline Peaks

Road ID
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2011, 04:21:44 pm »
Not to promote a specific product, but you might consider getting Road ID band (www.roadid.com)

Offline staehpj1

Re: safety on a tour bike ride
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2011, 05:14:32 pm »
Use good sense and be aware of your surroundings, but don't worry.  In general the risks are the same as the risks when riding near home, so just do what you do there.

The biggest risk is a traffic accident for most of us the roads where we tour are probably safer than the roads at home.

Offline paddleboy17

Re: Road ID
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2011, 01:01:10 pm »
Not to promote a specific product, but you might consider getting Road ID band (www.roadid.com)

I have a couple of their products.  I wear a writst band when I kayak, so I can be identified if something unfortunate happens.  I also wear a wrist band when I ride, but more because I have a drug allergy than any other reason.  You need to carry some ID like a license when you ride, but Road ID is pretty good for drug allergies.  You can list what you want.  A contact number for a spouse would be a good thing.
Danno