Author Topic: Light Touring  (Read 10992 times)

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Offline Pinellas Paul

Re: Light Touring
« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2011, 05:08:15 pm »
Paul, your list implies you're in the southern or southwestern USA with narry a care for the weather. Even in Idaho, I'd need to add two or three more layers to know I'd be safely warm cresting 6000-9000 foot passes where the weather can turn within moments.

Don't forget, besides water, you need some food on the bike and a place to put it.

Lite touring also implies your'e doing laundry every night.



We toured on the north east in the summer but can ride year 'round since we retired to semi tropical Florida last November.

Of course, we have water bottles and can carry a couple of cliff bars or bananas in our jersey pockets but we eat where we can on the road, stay in motels, and wash one set of cycling clothes every night. If they aren't dry in the morning, we carry a couple of spring type clothes pins and hang them from the cables to dry while we ride.



Offline bogiesan

Re: Light Touring
« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2011, 07:52:23 am »
Yes, those details are not immediately apparent to newbies around here. You may have researched your process thoroughly before setting out but I'm betting you needed three or more trips to perfect your techniques and hone your equipment inventories.

I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline Pinellas Paul

Re: Light Touring
« Reply #17 on: November 13, 2011, 11:59:59 am »
I've been seriously cycling for more than 40 years and CC touring about 35.

It only takes a couple of tours to realize how little you need.

Offline johnsondasw

Re: Light Touring
« Reply #18 on: November 13, 2011, 04:13:11 pm »
15 lbs? I'd just throw it in a small backpack and tie it on top of the rear rack.

And then you've got an easy pack to carry around and/or to go for a hike in.
May the wind be at your back!